Source:

Nursing2015

October 2004, Volume 34 Number 10 , p 33 - 34 [FREE]

Authors

Abstract

 © 2004 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc. Volume 34(10)             October 2004             p 33–34 JCAHO announces new goals for 2005 [Clinical Rounds: NEWS, UPDATE, RESEARCH: PATIENT SAFETY]

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The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) has announced its 2005 National Patient Safety Goals (NPSGs). For hospitals, the new requirements stress improving the timeliness of critical test-result reporting to caregivers, reducing drug errors, and preventing falls. Effective January 1, 2005, JCAHO requires hospitals to:

* accurately and completely collect information about patients' current medications and share that knowledge with other caregivers who may need it. The patient should participate in this process.

* assess and periodically reassess each patient's risk of falling and address identified risks

* measure, assess, and, if ...

 

The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) has announced its 2005 National Patient Safety Goals (NPSGs). For hospitals, the new requirements stress improving the timeliness of critical test-result reporting to caregivers, reducing drug errors, and preventing falls. Effective January 1, 2005, JCAHO requires hospitals to:

 

* accurately and completely collect information about patients' current medications and share that knowledge with other caregivers who may need it. The patient should participate in this process.

 

* assess and periodically reassess each patient's risk of falling and address identified risks

 

* measure, assess, and, if appropriate, improve the timeliness of reporting critical test results and values to the responsible licensed caregiver

 

* create a list of look-alike/sound-alike drugs used in the facility and take action to avoid mix-ups. The list should be reviewed at least once a year.

 

 

Besides hospital care, the NPSGs specify safety goals and requirements for nine other health care categories, including disease-specific programs, ambulatory care, home care, long-term care, and labs. A new goal in the disease-specific category is to reduce the risk of influenza and pneumococcal disease in older adults. Requirements for reaching that goal include developing a protocol for administering and documenting the flu and pneumococcus vaccines and identifying new cases of disease.

 

For complete NPSGs in each category, visit the JCAHO Web site at http://www.jcaho.org.

The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) has announced its 2005 National Patient Safety Goals (NPSGs). For hospitals, the new requirements stress improving the timeliness of critical test-result reporting to caregivers, reducing drug errors, and preventing falls. Effective January 1, 2005, JCAHO requires hospitals to:

* accurately and completely collect information about patients' current medications and share that knowledge with other caregivers who may need it. The patient should participate in this process.

* assess and periodically reassess each patient's risk of falling and address identified risks

* measure, assess, and, if appropriate, improve the timeliness of reporting critical test results and values to the responsible licensed caregiver

* create a list of look-alike/sound-alike drugs used in the facility and take action to avoid mix-ups. The list should be reviewed at least once a year.

Besides hospital care, the NPSGs specify safety goals and requirements for nine other health care categories, including disease-specific programs, ambulatory care, home care, long-term care, and labs. A new goal in the disease-specific category is to reduce the risk of influenza and pneumococcal disease in older adults. Requirements for reaching that goal include developing a protocol for administering and documenting the flu and pneumococcus vaccines and identifying new cases of disease.

For complete NPSGs in each category, visit the JCAHO Web site at http://www.jcaho.org.