Maintaining Work-Life Balance [Infographic]

It can get complicated to juggle our personal and professional lives. This infographic will help you take a closer look at what you need to do to keep yourself healthy – physically, mentally, and emotionally. 
 

Maintaining Work-Life Balance in Nursing

Use My Nursing Care Plan for 2016 for a full look at assessing, planning, and implementing your goals for the year ahead!  

More Resources:
Meeting My Professional Requirements [Infographic]
Being a Lifelong Learner in Nursing [Infographic]

 

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Posted: 2/11/2016 10:18:12 PM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 9 comments

Categories: InspirationEducation & Career


Setting and meeting goals

The secret to getting ahead is getting started ~ Mark Twain

setting and meeting goals in nursingAs nurses, there are many different roads we take on our journey to where we are now professionally. We all have different starting points and are currently at different places on this professional road. Similarly, there is immense variation in how we set and achieve our goals. There are volumes of literature on goal setting and achievement and the methods are not a one-size-fits-all formula. The key to successful goal management is figuring out what works for you, being honest with yourself about what your current and future goals are and coming up with a plan to achieve what you set out to do. Personality, life circumstances, and family-work balance all play roles in how we set and achieve goals, as well as our motivation to accomplish them.

Personally, I began my professional career in medical research with a degree in the sciences. I quickly determined that I wanted to interact with patients rather than study them from inside a room (my project involved taking measurements on carotid arteries [recorded loops on VHS] – in a dark room – as part of a cardiovascular research project). When I came to this realization, I organized my first five-year plan with a goal of becoming a nurse. I applied to and was accepted to a nursing program. I went on to receive my BSN and subsequently my MSN, which I completed in 2001 with the help of a National Health Service Corp Scholarship. I began working at a Federally Qualified Healthcare Center as a Family Nurse Practitioner. and after fulfilling my commitment to the scholarship, I was able to do a loan repayment program at the same health center. Within five years, I had all of my undergraduate and nursing loans payed off. Using the five-year framework allows for short and long-term goal setting with some flexibility factored in for the unexpected. While I personally work better with this flexibility, others may find more success with a stricter plan; this is where we need to be honest with ourselves and come up with a method that works best.

Fast forward eight years. Following a job transition, I was offered a position working in an ICU as a nurse practitioner. Although this was not in my original plans, and well out of my comfort zone, the opportunity was one that I could not pass up and presented an exciting new challenge. Around this same time, the Consensus model for APRN regulation: Licensure, accreditation, certification, and education (APRN Consensus Work Group, 2008) was released. This landmark publication for NP practice essentially recommended that NPs practice in the discipline/setting for which they were educated and certified. Although this seems straight forward, NP history is one whose roots began in primary care with evolution to the acute care setting. Educational programs for acute care NPs were introduced later in the historical timeline, and the fact is that there are many primary care NPs practicing in hospitals. So now, with no plans to leave the ICU, my current five-year plan includes completion of a post-master’s program to become certified as an adult-gerontological acute care nurse practitioner. This was an adjustment I needed to make, but it is a great opportunity to improve my skills and my job performance.
reach for the stars in nursing
I mentioned the flexibility to my plans earlier. There was an approximately five-year period in my life (i.e. when my children were infants) when I struggled to keep up with my plan, or rather, I had no plan! Memories of these years include crunching to find online CME and overnight expressing my license applications and sometimes struggles to just get through the day. For me, despite being a competent nurse at work, I found it overwhelming trying to figure out parenting and how to be a working mom. The learning curve of parenting and navigating the work-life balance was steep. Eventually, I was able to get back on track. Moving forward, I have reset my five-year plan once again (it’s a moving target). I hope to complete the acute care NP program in December 2016 then take and pass (fingers crossed) the exam in the spring of 2017. After that, I may try to teach, or possibly consider a DNP or PhD program.

I have not done extensive research from an academic or literature perspective on goal setting, but I do know that there are many successful methods for those that have difficulty with a flexible plan or prefer a more established format. For myself, it has been immensely helpful to take time, every so often, to reflect on where I am and where I would like to be. NursingCenter’s blog post, My Nursing Care Plan for 2016, provides an excellent resource for some of our requirements to keep up our professional obligations. Because in addition to our professional goal, there are tasks that we need to complete to stay current and licensed.

How do you like to set and achieve your goals? Has anyone found a more standard goal setting process that works for you? Please share your experiences with us!
 
Megan Doble, MSN, RN, CRNP
 
Reference:
APRN Consensus Work Group & the National Council of State Board of Nursing APRN Advisory Group. (July 7, 2008). Consensus Model for APRN Regulation: Licensure, Accreditation, Certification, & Education. 
Posted: 2/9/2016 9:35:45 PM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 6 comments

Categories: InspirationEducation & Career


Being a Lifelong Learner in Nursing [Infographic]

Lifelong learning is essential for your professional development and to ensure evidence-based patient care and improve outcomes. Use this infographic to help you stay on track and meet your goals!
 
lifelong learning in nursing 
 
Use My Nursing Care Plan for 2016 for a full look at assessing, planning, and implementing your goals for the year ahead!  
 

Add this infographic to your website by copying and pasting the following embed code:

Posted: 2/6/2016 5:44:19 AM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 4 comments

Categories: Continuing EducationInspirationEducation & Career


Meeting My Professional Requirements [Infographic]

It can be overwhelming to keep track of license and certification expiration dates and continuing education requirements for renewal. This infographic will help you stay on track to meet your professional requirements. 
 
meeting my professional nursing requirements

Use My Nursing Care Plan for 2016 for a full look at assessing, planning, and implementing your goals for the year ahead! 
 
 

Add this infographic to your website by copying and pasting the following embed code:

Posted: 1/31/2016 7:07:57 AM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 1 comments

Categories: Continuing EducationInspirationEducation & Career


My Nursing Care Plan

I know, I know, another care plan…but this one is for YOU! Use this quick care plan to make sure you are on the right track to meet your goals!
 

Assessment

meeting my professional nursing requirementsWhat do I need to do this year to meet my professional requirements?

  • When is my nursing license(s) due for renewal?
  • Am I on track to meet my CE requirements for license renewal?
  • Do I need to obtain CE to maintain my current certification(s)?

be a lifelong learner in nursingHow can I be a lifelong learner in nursing?

  • Is it time for me to go back to school?
  • Should I get certified in a specialty?
  • Which professional nursing organization(s) should I join?

work-life balance in nursingDo I have good work-life balance?

  • When’s the last time I had a physical exam?
  • Am I due for any immunizations or screenings?
  • Am I seeing my family and friends?
  • Do I have time to do things that bring me joy?
  • How is my stress level?

Nursing Diagnoses

  • Knowledge deficit related to meeting my professional requirements.
  • Readiness for enhanced knowledge related to striving to provide evidence-based nursing care.
  • Readiness for enhanced self-health management related to identifying my own health care needs.
  • Readiness for enhanced self-care related to maintaining personal relationships and managing stress.

Planning

Meeting my professional requirements
  • Look at my current nursing license(s) and certification(s) and check the expiration dates.
  • Visit the website of my state board of nursing for information on license renewal and CE requirements.
  • Contact my certification organization for information related to renewal and CE requirements.
  • Consider my options for meeting my CE requirements.
                   *Online CE activities.
                   *Live events, such as national or local conferences.
                   *Check for opportunities to earn CE through my employer.
Lifelong learning
  • Explore BSN and advanced degree programs.
  • Investigate specialty certification opportunities.
  • Consider which professional organizations would be a good fit for me.
Balancing work and life
  • Look back at my own medical records and make a list of what screenings and immunizations are recommended based on my age and medical and family history.
  • Update my calendar with my work schedule and upcoming social events. Schedule “me-time” too!
  • Think about how I best deal with stress. Is it a yoga class? Reading? Being outdoors? Find activities to meet my stress-relief needs.

Implementation

Meeting my professional requirements
  • Mark expiration dates on my calendar.
  • Develop a file (actual or online) to store my CE documents.
  • Use My Planner on Lippincott NursingCenter’s CEConnection to plan my CE activities and store my certificates.
  • Register for conferences and make travel plans. Inquire if my employer will contribute to covering costs.
Lifelong learning
  • Apply to a nursing program that meets my educational needs and goals.
  • Get certified!
  • Join and get involved with a professional nursing organization. Take advantage of related benefits and consider joining a committee or leadership position.
Balancing work and life
  • Schedule appointments and screenings.
  • Stick to my schedule, as best as I am able.
  • Sign up for a class, gym, or other activities that help me manage stress. Remain committed to these endeavors.

Evaluation

Revisit this care plan throughout the year and fill this in. Ongoing evaluation and revisions are key components to meeting my goals.

Leave a comment here – writing down your goals and plans is a good first step! Good luck!
join-LNC.JPG
 

 

Posted: 1/28/2016 11:57:26 AM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 4 comments

Categories: Continuing EducationInspirationEducation & Career


Reaching milestones on social media!

As we get further into the New Year, it’s exciting to reveal some milestones that we’ve reached already in 2016!

20,000+ likes on Facebook
13,000+ followers on twitter
14,000+ connections on LinkedIn
400+ followers on Google+

 
In 2016, we want to deepen our relationship with you, our members! Make sure your profile is up-to-date so we can personalize your NursingCenter experience in the coming months. You can get to know us better by viewing these Behind the Scenes videos, just published on our YouTube channel!  
Thank you!
 
Posted: 1/18/2016 9:56:30 PM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 0 comments

Categories: InspirationEducation & Career


How to Write for Our Nursing Journals

how to write for nursing journalsWriting for a nursing journal is a great way to advance your nursing career, get your voice heard, and share your particular nursing perspective on topics important to you. Lippincott NursingCenter hosts more than 50 nursing journals and we want to hear from you! 

As a digital editor for NursingCenter, I’ve really enjoyed learning more about the nursing profession and sharing my thoughts and ideas with our members. I frequently get asked by nurses how they can share their writing with NursingCenter. Getting published in an established, authoritative, peer-reviewed nursing journal is a great way to get involved.
 
Many of our journals are looking for talented nurses to write for their publication. Some of these journals include:

•    American Journal of Nursing
•    Computers Informatics Nursing
•    Home Healthcare Now
•    Journal of Christian Nursing
•    Journal of Forensic Nursing
•    Journal of Pediatric Surgical Nursing
•    Journal of the Dermatology Nurses’ Association
•    Journal of Trauma Nursing
•    Nursing Research
•    Nutrition Today
(See specific instructions for this journal in our blog, Consider Writing an Article for Nutrition Today)

You can see all of our nursing journals on our Journals page. Follow their Information for Authors instructions, and you will be well on your way to getting published. With our Editorial Manager system, the online submission and electronic peer review process is a breeze. There’s always assistance available for those who need it; most journals have production editors and managing editors who are very helpful. 

As a bonus, I’ve compiled some resources for getting published in a nursing journal from us and around the Web:

•  How Journal Publishing Really Works [VIDEO]
•  Tips for Getting Published in a Nursing Journal
•   How to Get an Article Published in a Nursing Journal 
•   Writing in the Digital Age
•   The Editor’s Handbook, 2nd Edition

•   Writing for Nursing Publication

Establish yourself as an expert in the nursing community and spread that nursing knowledge around by writing for our nursing journals.  
 
Posted: 1/8/2016 10:34:34 AM by Cara Deming | with 6 comments

Categories: Education & Career


Consider Writing an Article for Nutrition Today

write for nutrition todayNutrition is a huge component of health and well-being. Our bodies are amazing machines that need fuel – the correct types in the correct amounts – to function, grow, and heal. My colleagues in dietetics and I have been working for decades to ensure that nutrition is recognized as a vital sign in assessing patient health and well-being and that it is incorporated into providing care, yet we haven't gotten very far. Why? Until recently, the dietetics perspective and the nursing perspective were not collaboratively integrated into day-to-day practice.
 
A goal of our editorial team at Nutrition Today is to encourage registered dieticians and nutritionists (RDNs) and nurses to co-author articles that will integrate clinical perspectives and treatment into the coordinated patient care model. This collaboration can provide effective, interdisciplinary means of resolving care issues, thereby improving patient outcomes.
 
To do this, first I encourage you to get to know our journal: 

•    Nutrition Today is a peer-reviewed journal focused on translating the latest developments in nutrition science and policy to health care providers.
•    Nutrition Today reaches key opinion leaders in the health professions and nutrition sciences.
•    Nutrition Today features authoritative articles on topics such as educating patients on conflicted science around butter, saturated fat, sugars, and meat
•    Continuing education credit is available in each issue. 
•    Our associate editor, Dr. Rebecca Couris, is both a clinical pharmacist and a nutrition scientist. Along with another colleague, she has developed a series in the past year on the management of Type 2 Diabetes and hypoglycemia, with pros and cons of medications and their nutritional implications. 
•    We enlist some of the world’s experts to write authoritative columns on hot-topic and timely items, for example, drinking raw milk, and how to explain the pros and cons to patients.
•    We cover a variety of specialties, such as gerontology, where a strong collaboration between nursing and dietetics professionals is essential. Nurses understand the importance of ensuring smooth transitions from acute care to chronic care, and the importance of avoiding or minimizing readmissions. 

Nutrition Today hopes to launch a series of articles where nursing professionals and RDNs collaborate to share their knowledge with one another and our readers. Examples include: 

•    Caring for older adults whose diseases or treatments have nutritional implications
•    Managing the nutritional needs of certain populations, especially older adults, pregnant patients, and children.
•    Transitioning patients with serious gastrointestinal or neurological problems to home care .
•    Decision-making with regards to tube feeding at the end-of-life.
•    Delivering care to pregnant women and infants at high nutritional risk.
•    Managing interprofessional approaches to care delivery. 
•    Treating individuals with chronic degenerative diseases that have dietary or nutritional implications.

We invite you to work with an RDN from your hospital, home health agency, hospice, clinic or nursing home to co-author a paper on one of the suggestions above or a topic of your choice. Feel free to send me an email at nutritiontoday@cox.net so I can answer your query or help you develop your topic.  

We welcome your comments or suggestions on how to make our journal more helpful to nurses and the readers of our sister publications in nursing. 
 
Bon appetite!
 
Johanna Dwyer, D.Sc,RD
Editor, Nutrition Today
 
More Reading & Resources
How to Write for Our Nursing Journals
 
 
Posted: 11/20/2015 9:29:37 AM by Cara Deming | with 2 comments

Categories: Education & Career


Conference Wrap-Up: LCNC & NMC

disney resort for nursing conference
How does a week in Disneyworld sound? Good, right? Add in two dynamic nursing conferences and you’ve got an amazing week! While it was busy, I’d like to share some highlights and encourage you to make attending a nursing conference a priority. There is nothing like being surrounded by nurses, hearing from nurses, and hanging out with nurses to renew your passion for nursing!

 


LCNC

lippincott clinical nursing conference swagLippincott Clinical Nursing Conference (LCNC) was up first. Geared to front-line nurses, this clinical-intensive included skill building sessions related to cardiac, pulmonary, and neurologic assessments. During the opening address, Christine Kessler, MN, CNS, ANP-BC, ADM, CDTC, FAANP gave attendees a choice in what they wanted to learn about – managing patients with diabetes or the impacts of shift work. I don’t know many speakers who can poll the audience and then present based on those results! If you’re wondering, attendees opted to hear about shift work and the session was informative and thought-provoking. While some might think that night shift is the most opportune time for nurses to take care of certain tasks (think baths and other personal care), it’s not always what’s best for patients. 

Another opportunity that presented itself to me at LCNC was the chance to speak myself. It’s been a while since I presented to a large group and it felt good to connect with attendees during the session on adverse drug reactions. I quickly got through my nerves and I think that we all learned some things!  

Nursing Management Congress

carolyn jones and lisa bonsall at nursing conferenceNursing Management Congress (NMC) followed and did not disappoint. Never have I attended a conference session where the opening session ended in a standing ovation followed by silence. I’ve been a fan of Carolyn Jones’ work on The American Nurse Project for several years. I am not kidding that I was somewhat starstruck sitting there in the front row while she presented and then again later when I met her in the exhibit hall. I’m also really looking forward to her new project, Dying in America. I’ve mentioned before about my interested in end-of-life care and after watching the trailer for this new film, I know I won’t be disappointed. 

I also spent time helping out with the New Manager Intensive preconference workshops. Day one focused on finance and day two focused on leadership. Wow! I knew nurse managers have a lot to juggle, but these two days really opened my eyes to the amount of calculations, hiring and firing issues, workplace conflict situations, and so much more that’s involved in their work each day. I’ll be sharing some more from this conference in the next few days, so stay tuned…

Don’t forget to visit Lippincott’s eConference Center to complete your session evaluations and obtain your CE certificates. You can see more photos from these conferences on NursingCenter’s Facebook page

 
Posted: 10/20/2015 9:21:45 PM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 0 comments

Categories: Continuing EducationLeadership Education & Career


CSASWC 2015

Clinical Symposium on Advances in Skin & Wound Care (CSASWC)Last month’s Clinical Symposium on Advances in Skin & Wound Care (CSASWC) was a wonderful meeting of clinicians, including nurses, physicians, physical therapists, wound care specialists, educators, podiatrists, administrators, and others who strive to stay up-to-date on the latest evidence and products. From networking between sessions, learning from expert presenters, and connecting with exhibitors, this was a not-to-be-missed event.

The Symposium celebrated its 30th Anniversary and was held at the Hyatt Regency New Orleans. The backdrop for this event was spectacular – a wonderful city, incredible sports fans (both Louisiana State University and the Saints played that weekend), and endless options for food and entertainment contributed to the appeal of attending this conference! You can see some pictures from the event in our CSASWC 2015 album on Facebook

Please allow me to share a few of the clinical pearls that I picked up during the conference: 
  • “Typically, neonatal and pediatric pressure ulcers are a result of medical devices.”
    International Pressure Ulcer Prevention and Treatment Guidelines: How Do You Use Them?, 
    Laura Edsberg, PhD

  • “All antibiotics are antimicrobial, but not all antimicrobials are antibiotics. Antibiotics can inhibit or kill the organism; antimicrobials inhibit bacterial growth, but do little or no damage to the host.”
    When Dressings Just Aren’t Enough: Pharmaceuticals and Supplements for Wound Healing
    Phyllis Kupsick, RN, MSN, FNP-BC, CWOCN, PRN

  • “Deep tissue injury is common in the ICU population. The sacrum and the heels are the most common sites.”
    What is? Wound Care Jeopardy!
    Gregory Bohn, MD, FACS, FACHM

  • “Even with the change to ICD-10, documentation is the key to success!”
    10-Day Countdown to ICD-10-CM
    Kathleen D. Schaum, MS
Our upcoming events include Lippincott’s Clinical Nursing Symposium and Nursing Management Congress. Find more information on key nursing and healthcare events here

What are your conference plans this fall?  

 
Posted: 10/2/2015 8:37:36 AM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 1 comments

Categories: Continuing EducationEducation & Career


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