Celebrate Nursing 2015: Part 1

Here are the nursing recognition days, weeks, and months for the first half of 2015. Please leave a comment if you know of others so I can add them to our list! Thank you!

National IV Nurse Day January 25, 2015

National Nurse Anesthetists Week January 25-31, 2015

PeriAnesthesia Nurse Awareness Week February 2-8, 2015

Critical Care Transport Nurses Day February 18, 2015

Certified Nurses Day March 19, 2015

GI Nurses and Associates Week March 23-27, 2015

Transplant Nurses Day April 15, 2015

National Critical Care Awareness and Recognition Month May 2015

Oncology Nursing Month May 2015

National Nurses Week May 6-12, 2015 (National Nurses Day is May 6)

National School Nurse Day May 6, 2015

National Student Nurses Day May 8, 2015

International Nurses Day May 12, 2015

National Nursing Home Week May 10-17, 2015

Neuroscience Nurses Week May 17-23, 2015

Vascular Nursing Week June 7-13, 2015

38th Annual National Nursing Assistants Week June 11-18, 2015

Take some time to celebrate your hard work and be sure to recognize the work of your colleagues too! 

Posted: 1/27/2015 12:04:30 PM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 0 comments

Categories: Inspiration


NursingCenter’s New Year’s Resolutions

As we get into 2015, here are some resolutions you can expect from Lippincott NursingCenter!

1. All of our enewsletters are getting a new look! We know that many of you check your email from your phone or tablet; we want to make sure that your are getting the best information in the best format for your device! Here is a peek at our newly launched NursingCenter enews

        

 

2. NursingCenter will also be getting a new look! Stay tuned for an update to our website. Make sure you are a registered member and that your profile is up-to-date. You will get content specific to your practice right on your NursingCenter home page!

3. Want to complete your CE activities while you are on-the-go? We have a new CE app in development, so you’ll be able to complete your CE activities right on your mobile device and then sync up with your computer to download and print your certificate! 

4. Look for more CE collections and Focus On collections so you can easily find topical information and specially-priced offers! 

5. We are also committed to keeping you updated on your license renewal requirements. Check back often for updates for your state CE requirements!

6. We’ve got a line-up of Nurses on the Move to keep you abreast of the great things nurses are achieving in our profession! Remember, you can nominate a colleague, friend, or even yourself by emailing ClinicalEditor@NursingCenter.com.

We are looking forward to a great 2015 and hope that you’ll continue to use Lippincott NursingCenter for all of your professional and clinical needs!

Posted: 1/8/2015 1:56:11 AM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 0 comments

Categories: Inspiration


NursingCenter Named Top Blog for Nurses

Last week, NursingCenter’s In the Round was named one of the Top 100 Nursing Blogs by BestMedicalAssistantPrograms.org, and we couldn’t be more excited! Listed among a variety of blogs dedicated to nursing students, RN’s, NP’s, educators, travel nurses, and more, our blog is described as a site “dedicated to helping nurses be the best workers they can be.” Three of our recent posts are also cited as favorites, including:

Directing Nurses Back to Patient Care
Technology and Global Health: A Nurse Presents for the U.N.
Nurses Who Led the Way: Florence Nightingale

We are honored to be a part of this list and to be featured among some of the best blogs for nurses out there. We want to ensure the nursing community stays connected, so here is a list of our favorite blogs for nurses (these are listed in alphabetical order): 

AJN Off the Charts
ANS: Advances in Nursing Science Blog
CorrectionalNurse.net
JParadisi RN's Blog
Not Nurse Ratched 
Nurse Code
The Adventures of Nurse Niki
What Should We Call Nursing 

Thank you to all of the sites that have included us as a top resource for nurses in the past, including OnlineLPNtoRN.org, OnlineColleges.com, CorrectionalNurse.net, LVNtoRN.net, and Jacksonville University’s School of Nursing. We are grateful for the recognition and aim to continue to provide excellent content for nurses. 

What are some of your favorite nursing blogs? Leave them in the comments below! 

Posted: 10/2/2014 7:48:49 PM by Cara Deming | with 1 comments

Categories: Inspiration


Directing nurses back to patient care

What made you decide to become a nurse? Was it the thrill of directly impacting a patient’s life? Or, was it because you really love tracking down medications and filling out paperwork? I’m going to guess it wasn’t the latter, and the people at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement agree.

In a recent article this week in the Wall Street Journal, Laura Landro explored the institute’s new partnership with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to develop Transforming Care at the Bedside, a program “to help hospitals increase to 70% the amount of time nurses spend in direct patient care while improving the work environment for nurses.”

This initiative attempts to answer the increasing need to streamline the work nurses are doing, while improving nurses’ delegation practices, “shifting more routine tasks to certified nurse assistants and other less high skilled staffers.” In an interview between Landro and Patricia Rutherford, a nurse and vice president at the institute, Rutherford explained, “We shouldn’t be using expensive professional nursing time doing unnecessary and inefficient things when that time could be reinvested in direct patient care.”

The institute isn’t the first to notice the lack of time nurses are spending with patients. In 2008, the American Journal of Nursing published a series of studies that found direct patient care “accounts for less than 50% of working hours.”

NursingCenter’s own clinical editor, Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP, remembers her frustrations at the bedside. “Patient care is what nursing is all about. I can remember clearly being pulled away from the bedside searching for supplies or medications, or even fixing or calibrating equipment. One time, I was caring for a patient admitted with DKA (diabetic ketoacidosis), who needed finger stick blood glucose checks every hour for titration of his insulin drip. We had two machines on our unit and one was broken. At about my third hour of the shift, the machine that was working needed to be calibrated…[which] took quite some time. This event not only took me away from the bedside, but put him at risk as I was unable to check his blood sugar for about two hours. Fortunately, no untoward events occurred, but I remember thinking at the time, ‘There’s got to be a better way!’”

Studies show the more time a nurse is at the bedside, the better the outcomes. Bonsall explains, “The relationship between patient safety and nursing care is documented in the research, including direct impacts on healthcare-associated infection, readmission rates, and mortality. We are the ones noticing the subtle changes in a patient’s status. If we are repeatedly pulled away from the bedside, those changes can go unnoticed.”

In a 2010 internal audit conducted by Presbyterian Medical Center, it was discovered that “nurses were involved in direct patient care at the bedside for only 2.5 hours every 12-hour shift.” Nurses were spending too much time searching for missing test results and supplies and not enough time monitoring their patients. After implementing the Transforming Care at the Bedside program, the center was hitting “6.5 hours per shift at the end of 2013 with a goal to hit 8.5 hours by the end of 2015.”

Time will tell if the center is able to hit their goal. But, as more hospitals begin to take a robust approach at managing their nurses’ time and delegation strategies, the hope is to return nurses back to why they began their work in the first place – to care for the patients.

Posted: 7/25/2014 8:50:08 PM by Cara Deming | with 3 comments

Categories: Inspiration


Celebrate Nursing 2014: Part 2

celebrate.jpgI hope that 2014 has been a good year so far! It’s hard to believe we are heading into June soon and it's time to look ahead to nursing recognition days, weeks, and months for the second half of the year. (You can see what we’ve already celebrated this year in Celebrate Nursing 2014 Part 1). 

Vascular Nursing Week
June 8-14 

National Time Out Day
June 11  

37th Annual National Nursing Assistants Week
June 12-19  

Healthcare Risk Management Week
June 16-20  

National Nurses in Staff Development Week
July 15-19

National Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses Day
September 8  

Nephrology Nurses Week
September 14-20 

National Neonatal Nurses Day
September 15  

Gerontological Nursing Week
September 29-October 3  

National Midwifery Week
October 5-11 

Emergency Nurses Week
October 5-11 (Emergency Nurses Day is October 8) 

National Pediatric Nursing Week
October 6-12 

National Case Management Week
October 12-18  

National Hospice/Palliative Care Month
November 

Urology Nurses and Associates Week
November 1-7  

Medical-Surgical Nurses Week
November 2-8 

Emerging Nurse Leaders Week
November 2-8 

Perioperative Nurses Week
November 9-15 

National Nurse Practitioner Week
November 9-15 

Forensic Nurses Week
November 10-14 

Remember to celebrate yourselves and your colleagues! 

Posted: 5/26/2014 1:25:38 PM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 0 comments

Categories: Inspiration


The ‘Threat’ of NPs: An NCNP 2014 Wrap-Up

It’s been a little over a week since the National Conference for Nurse Practitioners in Chicago, and I  am reviewing my notes and reminded of the learning and networking that took place during the conference. On my very first page, from the Welcome and Opening Remarks of Conference Chairperson, Margaret A. Fitzgerald, DNP, FNP-BC, NP-C, FAANP, SCP, FAAN, DCC, I had written the following: 

 

threat-of-nps.jpg

I remember this point vividly, as Dr. Fitzgerald had commented that years ago, when our numbers were much smaller, not too many people had an issue with nurse practitioners practicing to the full extent of our education and training. Now however, as there are over 180,000 nurse practitioners, the power of our numbers is threatening to many, even despite recent research demonstrating our value in patient outcomes and satisfaction. This point is incredibly evident in this recent Op Ed piece from The New York Times, Nurses are not Doctors, where the author cites a study from 1999 to support his opinion, which is clearly not the most up-to-date, best available evidence. Have you read it? I encourage you to do so when you are sitting down, because it did bring out a bit of my temper. Rest assured that some leaders in nursing did reply with some Letters to the Editor and you can read them here

And now back to some take-aways from NCNP…

*The states with the least restrictive NP regulations see twice as many patients as those in other states.
Carol L. Thompson, PhD, DNP, ACNP, FNP, FCCM, FAANP
Keynote Address: Awesome Practiced Daily

 

 

*Don’t use an ARB and ACE inhibitor concomitantly to treat hypertension.
Joyce L. Ross, MSN, CRNP, CLS, FNLA, FPCNA
JNC-Late: A Focus and Update on the Long-Awaited Hypertension Guidelines

 

 

*Not all infected patients are febrile and not all febrile patients are infected.
Lynn A. Kelso, RN, ACNP-BC, FCCM, FAANP
Acute: Fever of Unknown Origin in Adults

 

 

*If a patient has an inappropriate tachycardia related to his elevated temperature, consider pulmonary embolism as the cause.
Lynn A. Kelso, RN, ACNP-BC, FCCM, FAANP
Acute: Fever of Unknown Origin in Adults

 

 

*Sepsis doesn’t kill patients; multisystem organ failure resulting from sepsis does.
Sophia Chu Rodgers, ACNP, FNP, FAANP, FCCM
Acute: Understanding the Latest Sepsis Guidelines

 

 

*If a patient has kidney injury, used unfractionated heparin for DVT prophylaxis.
Sophia Chu Rodgers, ACNP, FNP, FAANP, FCCM
Acute: Understanding the Latest Sepsis Guidelines

 

 

*Our patients give us very important information, if we listen!
Christine Kessler, RN, MN, CNS, ANP, BC-ADM
Common Sense Assessment Tips Every NP Should Know

 

 

*If a patient has loss of the hair that makes up the outer eyebrows, think hypothyroidism. 
Christine Kessler, RN, MN, CNS, ANP, BC-ADM
Common Sense Assessment Tips Every NP Should Know

 

 

*The presence of pulsus paradoxus is a sign of cardiac tamponade, but can also be seen in severe asthma.
Christine Kessler, RN, MN, CNS, ANP, BC-ADM
Common Sense Assessment Tips Every NP Should Know

 

 

*To assess judgment in patients with traumatic brain injury, ask “What would you do if there was a fire in your kitchen?”
Tracey Andersen, MSN, CNRN, FNP-BC, ACNP-BC
Neuro Assessment and Diagnostic Work-up for Advanced Practitioners

 

 

Thanks for reading this wrap-up! Want to see photos from the event? Here’s our album – enjoy! 

Posted: 5/5/2014 1:05:42 PM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 0 comments

Categories: Inspiration


Shampoo-rinse-repeat

I was a new graduate working in the Medical ICU, a few weeks off orientation, when I cared for Jenny*. She was 18 years old, the youngest patient on our unit. It was not the norm for such a young person to be a patient on our unit. In fact, it was odd. 

She was a college student who had gone to Student Health Services with an upper respiratory infection. She was given antibiotics and sent on her way. Why did she develop acute respiratory failure? I’m not sure anyone ever knew that answer. It was just one of those things…

Jenny spent a long time in our unit – months – battling the gamut of ICU complications we were used to seeing, just not in someone so young. ARDS, renal failure, GI bleed…just to name a few. She had her share of time spent on vasopressors, paralytics, and sedatives; endured arterial lines, SWAN placement, and dialysis; received multiple blood transfusions and courses of antibiotics; and was on and off isolation precautions for various resistant organisms. A tracheostomy and g-tube were placed when she became more stable and ready to wean from the ventilator. 

I was usually the nurse that wanted the sickest patients. I didn’t mind getting an unstable new admission or going on a road trip with a patient to a diagnostic study or procedure. One of my best days, however, was a slow one in the unit. Jenny was fairly stable, and she was my only patient that day. Her mom was there and was always eager to help with Jenny’s care. 

As the shift went on, and it looked like things were going to stay quiet on the unit (not that we EVER said that our loud), I asked Jenny if she’d like me to wash her hair. Her eyes got real big and she looked at me questioningly. She nodded.

Like many tasks, it took longer to gather supplies than to actually perform it. I finally found real shampoo (and conditioner!), used a water pitcher for wetting her hair and rinsing, set up a trash bag to catch the excess water, and piles and piles of towels. 

Jenny’s mom and I worked together washing her hair. We joked about opening our own salon and Jenny was smiling looking up at us. We made a mess and all got pretty wet, but it was worth it. We had gotten those weeks of knots and dried blood and betadine from her hair, combed it neatly, and it smelled so nice! 

When we finished, Jenny asked for a paper and pen. She wrote “Think you could shave my legs?”

Her mom and I looked at each other. “Sure."

*Not her real name.

Posted: 3/14/2014 2:17:55 PM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 1 comments

Categories: Inspiration


Well done, CVS!

cvs.pngMy very first job was at a CVS store. I worked as a cashier there in high school and for 2 summers during college. As a cashier, I was responsible for restocking the cigarettes behind the counter…not a part of the job that I enjoyed, but it passed the time when we were slow. The area behind the counter was pretty narrow, and I would often have to step over and around cases of cigarettes while working. They sold quickly back then and my hands would smell of cigarettes after an evening of work.

I was impressed when I read the announcement yesterday that CVS stores would no longer be selling cigarettes. What an example this organization is setting, and I am hopeful that this will start a trend among other pharmacies and retailers. 

""Ending the sale of cigarettes and tobacco products at CVS/pharmacy is the right thing for us to do for our customers and our company to help people on their path to better health,"" Larry J. Merlo, president and CEO of CVS Caremark, said in a statement. ""Put simply, the sale of tobacco products is inconsistent with our purpose.""

 

 

Along with this news, the company has announced the launch of a smoking cessation plan this spring. 

Well done, CVS! 

According to the 2014 Surgeon General's Report: The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress, there are 12 cancers and 20 chronic diseases linked causally to smoking. It is encouraging that the prevalence of cigarette smoking has declined from 42% in 1962 to 18% in 2012  (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2014), however, it is even more encouraging that smoking cessation programs are continuing to be developed. There is more work to be done to educate the public and help people to not start smoking and to quit if they already do smoke.

More Resources:

Reference:
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2014, January). 50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General, 2014. Retrieved from SurgeonGeneral.Gov: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/reports/50-years-of-progress/50-years-of-progress-by-section.html 

Posted: 2/6/2014 1:36:08 PM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 0 comments

Categories: Inspiration


Celebrate Nursing 2014: Part 1

As we move into 2014, let’s not forget to celebrate our hard work and that of our colleagues! Here’s the list of nursing recognition days and months for the first part of 2014*. Please let me know if you know of others.

*I will add/update links as they become available.

National Nurse Anesthetists Week
January 19-25, 2014

National IV Nurse Day
January 25, 2014

PeriAnesthesia Nurse Awareness Week
February 3-9, 2014

Critical Care Transport Nurses Day
February 18, 2014

GI Nurses and Associates Week
March 24-28, 2014

Certified Nurses Day
March 19, 2014

Radiologic & Imaging Nurses Day
April 12, 2014

April 16, 2014
 
May 2014
 
May 2014
 
May 6-12, 2014 (National Nurses Day is May 6)
 
May 7, 2014
 
May 7, 2014
 
May 12, 2014
 
May 11-17, 2014
 
May 11-17, 2014
Posted: 1/18/2014 1:29:54 PM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 0 comments

Categories: Inspiration


Shhhhh...Listen

On New Year’s Day, an interview on the Today Show with Jon Gordon, a motivational expert and author, caught my attention. Mr. Gordon’s advice for those of us making resolutions for 2014, was to keep it simple by selecting one word to focus on for the upcoming year. Joni, over at Nursetopia, has been doing this for a few years and has shared her reflection on her words from 2012 and 2013, as well as her word for 2014.

After much thought, I’ve decided that my one word for 2014 will be “listen.” I often find myself thinking of my to-do list or what I will say next while someone else is talking, and before I know it, I’ve missed out on what he or she has said. As nurses, being good listeners is incredibly important – patients often confide in us and share things that they don’t tell anyone else. If we miss it, how can we be the best advocates for them?

While it would be great to just say “I’m going to always listen well,” I know that even with my best intentions, this won't happen. Being a better listener is going to take some work. So I’ve dug through our library and searched the web for some strategies to help sharpen my listening skills. Here’s what I found…

Tips for improving your listening skills

1. “SOLER” up: 

 

*Squarely face the patient

 

*Open up your posture (keep your arms uncrossed)

 

*Lean toward the patient

 

*Eye contact

 

*Relax

 

2. Eliminate distractions.

 

3. Be present in the current moment. Give your full attention and listen as if you will have to repeat what you are told.

 

4. Don’t interrupt.

 

5. Acknowledge the patient by nodding or using conversation cues, such as “yes” and “go on.”

 

6. Pay attention to nonverbal cues.

 

7. Use active listening or reflective listening to repeat back what a patient is telling you. This can encourage them to go on or to clarify what they are saying. For example, “It sounds like you’re saying the pain gets worse at night.”

 

8. When you notice that you are not listening, fix it by refocusing your attention. If necessary, apologize and ask the patient to repeat what you missed.

 

I realize some of these tips can be tricky depending on the environment in which you work. My advice? Do the best you can and try to ensure you’ll have ample time to hear responses when asking open-ended questions. Good luck!

Oh, and --- What is your word for 2014?

 

References

Calcagno, K. (2008). Listen Up...Someone Important is Talking. Home Healthcare Nurse, 333-336.

Jarrow, C. (2013, August 26). 10 Ways to Be Present and Be a Better Listener. Retrieved from Time Management Ninja: http://timemanagementninja.com/2013/08/10-ways-to-be-present-and-be-a-better-listener/

McMullen, L. (2013, August 24). How to Actually be a Good Listener. Retrieved from Huffington Post: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/24/how-to-be-a-good-listener_n_3795849.html

Richardson, L. (2012). Motivational Interviewing: Helping Patients Move Toward Change. Journal of Christian Nursing, 18-24.

Posted: 1/7/2014 2:20:25 PM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 1 comments

Categories: Inspiration


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