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As a clinician interested in dermatology and skin care information, you’ll want to stay up-to-date on the latest skin care information and research and clinical recommendations related to dermatology nursing. More...

 
 

 

 

Clinical Update

Whether you are a nurse practitioner, registered nurse, or other healthcare provider interested in dermatology and skin care information, take some time to become familiar with the valuable resources found in our clinical updates. More...  

 Defining Acne and Targeted Therapy
Journal of the Dermatology Nurses' Association, December 2015

Acne vulgaris is a complex disorder of the pilosebaceous unit. The cause is multifactorial, and thus, combination treatments are necessary to combat this condition. To effectively treat this condition and relay educational materials to the patient, one must understand the "language of acne." In this article, we aim to simplify the terminology of acne by presenting a synopsis of the pathophysiology, while detailing the nomenclature of the diverse topical treatment options.

More on acne...


Featured Article

Sometimes an article or resource related to dermatology and skin care is one that is a definite “must-read!” More...

 Alternate Light Source Findings of Common Topical Products
Journal of Forensic Nursing 

One of the important roles of a forensic clinician is to perform examinations of patients who are victims and suspects of crime. Alternate light source (ALS) is a tool that can improve evidence collection and enhance visualization of injuries. The purpose of this study was to examine if commonly used topical products fluoresce or absorb when examined with an ALS. Second, we aimed to identify patient and examination variables that may impact findings. 

 

Featured Image

The skin is the largest organ of the human body, yet we are able to see dermatologic disorders and skin changes fairly easily. More...  
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Source: Marchese, N. & Primer, S. (2013). Targeting Lyme diseaseNursing2013, 43(5). 

Erythema migrans is the most well-known sign of early localized Lyme disease. Note the targetlike concentric rings with no scale.

 


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