Nurses are Leaders

As nurses, we lead every day – no matter where we work, the patient populations that we care for, or our role in nursing. Ask yourself these questions below. If you answer ‘yes’ to any of them, you are a leader. Why? Because ALL nurses are leaders.
  • Are you an expert? What are some of the things that your colleagues come to you for repeatedly? Is it a question about a certain diagnosis or patient population? Or are the go-to person for placing I.V.s when there is a patient who is a difficult stick?
  • Are you an educator? Do you teach students or new nurses or precept new-to-your-unit nurses? Do you teach colleagues from other disciplines about the unit where you work? What about patient education?
  • Are you an advocate? Do you speak up for your patients and their families? How about for yourself? Your colleagues? The nursing profession?
  • Are you a role model? Do you take on the charge nurse role? Do you collaborate effectively with other nurses and other members of the health care team? Are you a nurse that others strive to be like? Do you model healthy behaviors for patients and the public?
  • Are you a voice for our profession? Are you educated about the issues affecting nursing and health care? Are you a committee member at your institution? Are you a member of a professional nursing organization? Are you involved in local, state, or national boards?
  • Are you a nurse? How often do family members and friends come to you with a health-related question or advice? The title ‘nurse’ signifies leadership to those around us.

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Lippincott Clinical Leaders Podcast

To help you be confident in your skills as a clinical leader, we are proud to bring you this new podcast series, Lippincott Clinical Leaders. Hear from experts about important clinical topics to reinforce your knowledge and skills and help you lead at the bedside!



SBAR Communication 

Anne Dabrow Woods, DNP, RN, CRNP, ANP-BC, AGACNP-BC, FAAN
In this episode, Dr. Anne Dabrow Woods, Chief Nurse of Health Learning, Research and Practice talks about SBAR communication. Learn how to use this structured, concise way to communicate using the acronym SBAR, which stands for situation, background, assessment, and recommendation.


 

Rapid Response Teams             

Elizabeth Tomaszewski, DNP, RN, CRNP, CNE, CCRN, ACNP-BC, ACNPC
Coming June 17, 2024!

Cardiac Output             

Anne Dabrow Woods, DNP, RN, CRNP, ANP-BC, AGACNP-BC, FAAN
Coming June 27, 2024!

Neuro Terminology      

Robin Coyne MSN, RN, AGACNP-BC
Coming July 12, 2024!

Chest Pain        

Anne Dabrow Woods, DNP, RN, CRNP, ANP-BC, AGACNP-BC, FAAN
Coming July 31, 2024!

Neuro Assessment       

Robin Coyne MSN, RN, AGACNP-BC
Coming August 15, 2024!

The Nurse's Role during a Code           

Elizabeth Tomaszewski, DNP, RN, CRNP, CNE, CCRN, ACNP-BC, ACNPC
Coming August 28, 2024!

The NIH Stroke Scale   

Robin Coyne MSN, RN, AGACNP-BC
Coming September 13, 2024!