Practice Specialties


Informatics
Nursing informatics is a specialty focused on combining the practice of nursing science and knowledge, with the management of information and communication technologies to promote the health of people, families, and communities.What do informatics nurses do?Learn More...Using information structures, processes, computers, and technology, nursing informaticists supports nurses, consumers, patients, the healthcare team, and administrators with the goals of achieving increased efficiency, lower costs, and improved quality of patient care. Emphasis is placed on enhancing the speed and accuracy of the charting process through the implementation of electronic medical record (EMR) (or electronic health records [EHRs]). However, nursing informaticists may also work with bedside computing, robotics, and wearable technologies.Where do informatics nurses work?Learn More...Nursing informatics is a broad specialty where nurses may work in hospitals, consulting firms, universities and corporations in roles including, but not limited to, clinical analyst, informatics nurse specialist, director of clinical informatics, and clinical informatics coordinator. What do informatics nurses need to know?Learn More...A career in nursing informatics requires: project management skills.critical thinking.creativity.More informatics nursing resourcesLearn More...Guideline Summaries, including electronic health informationBlog posts, with infographics, mnemonics, tips, and moreJournal CIN: Computers, Informatics, NursingArticles and nursing continuing professional development (NCPD) activitiesHeadlines and news storiesSociety partners
Infusion Nursing
Infusion nursing is a specialty is focused on the care of patients receiving intravenous (IV) therapy, or medications and fluids via injection.What do infusion nurses do?Learn More...Infusion nurses ensure patients receive the correct IV for the treatment ordered, select and manage the appropriate device and monitor and evaluate the patient’s response to the IV therapy.Infusion nurses monitor patients, manage their tubing, maintain arterial catheters, and observe for potential drug complications.Where do infusion nurses work?Learn More...Infusion nursing is a broad specialty where nurses may work in home health agencies, skilled nursing facilities, hospitals, clinics, or offices. What do infusion nurses need to know?Learn More...Infusion nurses must: possess keen assessment and monitoring skills.be highly skilled at performing venipuncture.possess knowledge of different IV medications, fluids, and blood products.be aware of infection control precautions.be competent in working with a variety of different vascular access devices associated with infusions, such as peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) and midline access catheters.More infusion nursing resourcesLearn More...Nursing Pocket Cards, including IV fluids and complications of IV access devicesGuideline Summaries, including IV push medicationsBlog posts, with infographics, mnemonics, tips, and moreJournal Journal of Infusion NursingArticles and nursing continuing professional development (NCPD) activitiesHeadlines and news storiesSociety partners
Neurology
Neurology or neuroscience nursing is a specialty focused on preventing and treating conditions related to the nervous system, including the brain, spinal cord, and nerves.What do neuroscience nurses do?Learn More...Neuroscience nurses will manage conditions such as stroke, brain injuries, spinal cord injuries, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, and encephalitis, to name a few.Where do neuroscience nurses work?Learn More...Neuroscience nursing is a broad specialty where nurses may work in inpatient or outpatient settings, care for medical or surgical patients, and see patients through acute illness or help them manage chronic disease and rehabilitation. What do neuroscience nurses need to know?Learn More...A profession in neuroscience nursing requires: an understanding of normal nervous system anatomy and physiology.keen assessment and monitoring skills.vast knowledge about neurological diseases and conditions.ongoing education related to recommended prevention methods and treatment options.More neuroscience nursing resourcesLearn More...Nursing Pocket Cards, including cranial nerves and increased intracranial pressureGuideline Summaries, including pain, agitation, and delirium in the ICUBlog posts, with infographics, mnemonics, tips, and moreJournals Journal of Neuroscience NursingTopics in Language DisordersJournal of Neurologic Physical TherapyArticles and nursing continuing professional development (NCPD) activitiesHeadlines and news storiesSociety partners
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