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Keywords

Kangaroo holding, Mother-infant, Prematurity, Randomized trial, Skin-to-skin.

 

Authors

  1. Neu, Madalynn PhD, RN
  2. Robinson, JoAnn PhD
  3. Schmiege, Sarah J. PhD

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this randomized, controlled trial was to determine if nurse-supported kangaroo holding of healthy preterm infants in the first 8 weeks of the infant's life facilitates early behavioral organization and development.

 

Methods: We randomized 87 infants born between 32 and 35 weeks gestation and their mothers to one of three holding groups: kangaroo (skin-to-skin between mother's breasts), blanket (held in mother's arms), or control (no holding restrictions). Nurse-supported groups (kangaroo and blanket) received 8 weekly visits from a registered nurse who encouraged holding and provided education about infant development. The control group received brief social visits. Mothers recorded time held in a daily diary. The Assessment of Preterm Infant Behavior was administered when infants were 40 to 44 weeks postconceptional age.

 

Results: Total holding time averaged 4 to 5 hr/day and did not differ among groups. Mothers held kangaroo style an average of 59 min/day in the kangaroo group, and 5 and 9 min/day in the blanket and control groups, respectively (p < .001). Infants in the kangaroo and blanket groups had more optimal scores than the control group in Robust Crying (p = .015) indicating that they could arouse to vigorous crying and calm. Scores, except for Attention and State Regulation, were at least as high as those of full-term infants.

 

Clinical Implications: When kangaroo holding is compared to blanket holding, both methods may provide equal early behavioral organization and developmental benefit to the infant.