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Keywords

Cultural differences, Information and communication technologies, Israel, Nurses, Nursing students

 

Authors

  1. Warshawski, Sigalit PhD, RN
  2. Itzhaki, Michal PhD, RN
  3. Barnoy, Sivia PhD, RN

Abstract

Information and communication technologies have become essential and design-effective tools in the global healthcare system. Evidence suggests that information and communication technologies can promote nursing practice and patient satisfaction and quality of care. Competency with information and communication technologies is essential for both nurses and nursing students, and attitudes toward its use and perceived self-efficacy are important for implementation in the workplace. This study aimed to explore nurse and nursing student attitudes and perceived self-efficacy regarding information and communication technologies use in clinical practice and to examine professional and cultural differences between these groups in their attitudes and perceived self-efficacy in information and communication technologies use. A cross-sectional study was conducted among Israeli nursing students (n = 144) and registered nurses (n = 104). The findings revealed that respondents held overall positive attitudes toward information and communication technologies' use in clinical practice and perceived themselves as competent in this context. Significant differences were found between nurses and students in their attitudes toward information and communication technologies and information and communication technologies self-efficacy. Cultural group (Jewish/Arab) was found related to positive attitudes toward use of information and communication technologies in clinical practice. Nurse educators and managers should be aware of the potential impact of cultural and professional differences on the adoption and implementation of information and communication technologies and should institute initiatives within the organization and academia to manage cultural and professional discrepancies.