Article Content

BOOK REVIEW

Offering appropriate spiritual care is, at times, challenging due to time constraints and uncertainty about what a patient may need or accept. When the patient is of a religion unfamiliar to the nurse, the difficulty factor goes up. How can a nurse know what the patient believes and desires from a spiritual standpoint?

 

Fast Facts About Religion for Nurses: Implications for Patient Care (2019) by Elizabeth Johnston Taylor, PhD, RN, FAAN, allows busy nurses to quickly access information, while gaining meaningful context. Part of Springer Publishing's Fast Facts series, this helpful resource catalogs 31 religions and denominational groups. Nurses can rapidly reference bulleted details about worship and devotional practices, beliefs and practices related to illness and healing, beginning and end of life, diet and lifestyle, words and ways to comfort, and specific nursing implications.

 

Each chapter covers one religion or denominational group, such as Afro-Caribbean, Sikhism, traditional Chinese religions, three types of Judaism, and 17 varieties of Christianity. Another chapter answers common questions about how to relate to patients using religiously sensitive care, describing how and why religious beliefs are so integral in patient health. Taylor outlines questions and tips for nurses to use in assessing religiosity-an imperative starting point to spiritual caregiving.

 

This quick reference makes for fascinating perusal for the breadth of facts provided. Each chapter concludes with a bibliography.

 

Taylor, a professor of nursing in the graduate program at Loma Linda University (California), pursues research that explores spiritual responses to illness or impending death and how nurses can best support spiritual well-being. She has authored numerous books on spiritual care.

 

Fast Facts About Religion for Nurses: Implications for Patient Care (April 2019). Available in print and eBook formats. Springer Publishing Company.

 

CALL FOR PEER REVIEWERS

Are you interested in investing your experience and critical thinking in the growth of professional nursing? The Journal of Christian Nursing is seeking qualified nurses to evaluate manuscripts.

 

Peer reviewers are asked to review manuscripts about every 3 to 4 months but can always decline a review. Reviews are processed through the Editorial Manager system; an online tutorial is available for new users. Prospective reviewers must indicate their areas of expertise, as journal editors send manuscripts based on the reviewer's expertise.

 

Reviewers may decline an article sent for review if the content seems unsuitable or if the time frame of the review request is unfeasible. Reviewers are typically allotted 21 days to respond with their review. Peer reviewers can receive CE credit for high-quality reviewing and add this role to their curriculum vitae.

 

If you would like to join the JCN peer-reviewer panel or have questions about this role, e-mail mailto:jcn.me@intervarsity.org. Nurses from practice or education and with all degrees are welcome!

 

HOT TOPICS

The staff of JCN often works with first-time authors in developing their writing skills. We desire articles on the following topics: Traumatic Brain Injury, Mental Health, Organ Donation and Transplantation, Substance Abuse, Service Animals, HIV/AIDS, LGBTQ Care, Preventing Medication Errors, Workplace Impairment, Domestic Violence, Child Abuse, Elder Abuse, Bio Terrorism, Opioid Crisis, Infection Control, and Antibiotics Stewardship. JCN is also interested in topics of interest to you as an author! We prefer manuscripts over queries. Submit your work at http://www.editorialmanager.com/ncf-jcn/default.aspx.

 

WE'RE LISTENING: BEST ADVICE

We asked nurses on the NCF Facebook page to share the best nursing advice they've received. Here are a few responses:

 

"I'm all about the little things, and I treat each patient as if they are VIP. Do everything as if you are doing it for Christ."

 

"Take time for yourself so you can take care of others."

 

"Treat the patient, not the disease process, remembering the patients are so much more than their illnesses."

 

"A nurse leader with NCF told us at a conference that if we listen to others' stories, they will be more likely to listen to ours about Jesus."

 

Contact Us: Write to us at mailto:jcn.me@intervarsity.org or submit your comments online via JCN's Editorial Manager: http://www.editorialmanager.com/ncf-jcn/default.aspx.

 

Coming soon in JCN

 

* 2020 Directory of Christian Nursing Schools

 

* Intimate Partner Violence

 

* Not Everyone Should Be a Nurse Practitioner

 

* Out of the Foxhole: Spiritual Support for Veteran Students

 

* Caring for Daughters without Mothers

 

* Self-Care: A Stewardship Perspective