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Authors

  1. Akuamoah-Boateng, Kwame Asante DNP, ACNP-BC, RN
  2. Wiencek, Clareen PhD, ACNP-BC
  3. Esquivel, Jill H. PhD, FNP/ACNP-BC
  4. DeGennaro, Gina DNP, RN, CNS, AOCN
  5. Torres, Beth PhD, RN
  6. Whelan, James F. MD

Abstract

Interprofessional collaboration (IPC) is an essential component of care delivery needed to achieve optimal patient- and system-level outcomes. The purpose of this project was to measure the impact of a structured IPC model, RAMPED-UP, on hospital length of stay (LOS) in a surgical trauma population. The study design was a prospective cohort with a historical comparison group. The project was conducted at a Level 1 trauma center. The RAMPED-UP group constituted trauma patients admitted from October to December 2017 (n = 96). Trauma patients admitted from October to December 2016 constituted the pre-RAMPED-UP group (n = 98). The 2 groups were similar in demographics. Hospital LOS was not statistically significant between groups. Median RAMPED-UP LOS, defined as the number of days the patient received RAMPED-UP rounds, was 3 days. Patients in the RAMPED-UP group were more likely to be discharged home, with higher discharge-by-noon (DBN) rates of 18.2% (p = .005). A statistically significant correlation was found between incentive spirometry (I/S) values and hospital LOS and RAMPED-UP LOS in the RAMPED-UP group (95% CI: rs -0.301, p = .008; 95% CI: rs -0.270, p = .018, respectively). Although the RAMPED-UP model did not decrease hospital LOS, the model did significantly improve DBN and RAMPED-UP LOS. Further exploration of I/S values as a predictor of LOS is warranted. The use of a structured IPC model that includes essential members of the IPC team can aid in improving patient outcomes such as DBN.