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Keywords

intent to leave, job satisfaction, nurse practitioners, organizational support, primary care, quality of care

 

Authors

  1. Poghosyan, Lusine
  2. Ghaffari, Affan
  3. Liu, Jianfang
  4. McHugh, Matthew D.

Abstract

Background: Lack of organizational support in healthcare settings has been linked to high levels of clinician stress, burnout, and job dissatisfaction. Little research exists on organizational support for nurse practitioners.

 

Objective: We investigated the relationship between organizational support and nurse practitioner outcomes, including job satisfaction, intent to leave, and quality of care.

 

Methods: A cross-sectional survey design was used to collect survey data from nurse practitioners (n = 398) in primary care practices in New York State in 2017. Nurse practitioners completed mail surveys with validated measures of organizational support, job satisfaction, intent to leave, and quality of care. Information on participant demographics and work characteristics was also collected. Multilevel regression models assessed the relationship between organizational-level organizational support and resources measure and job satisfaction, intent to leave, and quality of care.

 

Results: The organizational-level organizational support and resources measure had a mean of 3.31 on a 4-point scale. Twenty-five percent of the participants were either moderately dissatisfied or very dissatisfied with their jobs, and about 11% intended to leave their current jobs within 1 year. The average quality of care rated by participants was 8.51 out of 10-10 being the best quality of care. After adjusting for covariates, higher organizational-level organizational support and resources measure score was associated with higher job satisfaction category, lower odds of intent to leave, and higher quality of care.

 

Discussion: Nurse practitioners from primary care practices with higher levels of organizational support are more likely to be satisfied with their jobs, have less intent to leave their jobs, and report better quality of care. Thus, in order to promote nurse practitioner job satisfaction, retain them in clinical positions, and improve quality of care, administrators should take actions to promote organizational support for them. Our findings are consistent with existing literature regarding the relationship between organizational support and clinician outcomes.