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Authors

  1. Steven, Alison PhD, RN
  2. Pearson, Pauline PhD, RN
  3. Turunen, Hannele PhD, RN
  4. Myhre, Kristin PhD, RN
  5. Sasso, Loredana PhD, RN
  6. Vizcaya-Moreno, Maria Flores PhD, RN
  7. Perez-Canaveras, Rosa Maria PhD, RN
  8. Sara-Aho, Arja RN
  9. Bagnasco, Annamaria PhD, RN
  10. Aleo, Giuseppe PhD
  11. Patterson, Lucy PgD, RN
  12. Larkin, Valerie PhD, RM
  13. Zanini, Milko PhD, RN
  14. Porras, Jari PhD
  15. Khakurel, Jayden PhD
  16. Azimirad, Mina RN
  17. Ringstad, Oystein PhD, MD
  18. Johnsen, Lasse MSc
  19. Haatainen, Kaisa PhD, RN
  20. Wilson, Gemma PhD, CHP
  21. Rossi, Silvia PhD, RN
  22. Morey, Sarah PhD, RN
  23. Tella, Susanna PhD, RN

Abstract

Background: Underpinning all nursing education is the development of safe practitioners who provide quality care. Learning in practice settings is important, but student experiences vary.

 

Purpose: This study aimed to systematically develop a robust multilingual, multiprofessional data collection tool, which prompts students to describe and reflect on patient safety experiences.

 

Approach: Core to a 3-year, 5-country, European project was development of the SLIPPS (Sharing Learning from Practice for Patient Safety) Learning Event Recording Tool (SLERT). Tool construction drew on literature, theory, multinational and multidisciplinary experience, and involved pretesting and translation. Piloting included assessing usability and an initial exploration of impact via student interviews.

 

Outcomes: The final SLERT (provided for readers) is freely available in 5 languages and has face validity for nursing across 5 countries. Student reports (n = 368) were collected using the tool.

 

Conclusions: The tool functions well in assisting student learning and for collecting data. Interviews indicated the tool promoted individual learning and has potential for wider clinical teams.