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Keywords

Oocyte donation, Perceptions, College students, Knowledge

 

Authors

  1. STEVENS, JOANNE B. PHD, FNP-BC, RNC
  2. HAYES, CASSANDRA BSN, RN

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To describe the perceptions of young female college students regarding oocyte donation (OD).

 

Methods: Descriptive survey of 330 female undergraduates.

 

Results: The subjects were primarily middle class, White, Christian, and lived in rural or suburban areas of upstate New York. The majority knew little about OD, but felt that the risk, time commitment, medications, and compensation would be most important in their decision to participate. Twenty-three percent would consider OD; 43% would most likely not consider it. Primary motivational factors for considering OD would be: helping another woman or couple (82%), and reimbursement for time and effort (11%). Deterring factors included medication and procedural risks (33%), lack of knowledge (30%), invasiveness of the process (21%), ethical reasons (7.5%), and religious reasons (6.5%).

 

Clinical Implications: Young female college students are routinely targeted for oocyte donation. It is essential that nurses who work in university health settings, reproductive endocrinology, or other obstetrics/gynecology venues be educated about oocyte donation, and be ready to provide nonbiased, comprehensive, and current information to college- age women. Education for this group should include medication side effects, procedural risks, recipient characteristics, and ethical considerations such as disposition of embryos. Nursing educators should also consider adding OD as a contemporary topic in nursing school curricula.