Practice Specialties


Orthopaedic Nursing
Orthopaedic nursing is a specialty focused on providing direct care to patients with disorders of the musculoskeletal system, including broken or fractured bones, joint disease, arthritis, tendinitis, tendon rupture, spinal stenosis, osteoporosis, and congenital conditions, to name just a few.What do orthopaedic nurses do?Learn More...Orthopaedic nurses care for patients in both the chronic and acute stages of disease, assist with increasing mobility and provide education to promote compliance with ongoing treatments.Where do orthopaedic nurses work?Learn More...Orthopaedic nurses may work in a variety of settings including hospitals (surgical units or operating rooms), outpatient care clinics, ambulatory care units, surgical centers, and offices.What do orthopaedic nurses need to know?Learn More...A profession in orthopaedic nursing requires: an understanding of the musculoskeletal system anatomy and physiology.keen neurovascular assessment skills.knowledge of orthopaedic diagnostic studies, complications related to surgical procedures and trauma, therapeutic modalities (continuous passive motion, ambulatory devices, fixators, traction, etc.) casting, and pain management.More orthopaedic nursing resourcesLearn More...Nursing Pocket Cards, including neurovascular assessment and assessment of all riskGuideline Summaries, including management of surgical site infectionsBlog posts, with infographics, mnemonics, tips, and moreJournal Orthopaedic NursingArticles and nursing continuing professional development (NCPD) activitiesHeadlines and news storiesSociety partners
Perioperative & Surgical Nursing
Perioperative & surgical nursing is a specialty focused on providing direct care to patients before (preoperative), during (intraoperative) and immediately following (postoperative) a surgical procedure.What do perioperative and surgical nurses do?Learn More...Before surgery, nurses obtain a medical history, assess laboratory tests, prep the patient for surgery, and educate the patient and family on the procedure to be performed.Scrub nurses work within the operating room preparing and sterilizing instruments, providing tools needed during the procedure and assisting with other tasks.Circulating nurses manage the overall operating room to ensure the environment is safe and remains sterile.Registered nurse first assistants may suture cuts, control and monitor bleeding, and perform other complex duties.Post-anesthesia care unit (PACU) nurses manage patients in the immediate postoperative period. They assess for infection, shock, bleeding and other complications, manage pain, change wound dressings, and provide discharge teaching to the patient and family.Where do perioperative and surgical nurses work?Learn More...Perioperative and surgical nurses may work in a variety of settings including hospital surgical departments, ambulatory surgery units, outpatient clinics or physician offices and may focus on a subspecialty such as cardiac surgery, trauma, pediatrics, oncology, plastic and reconstructive, urology and neurosurgery.What do perioperative and surgical nurses need to know?Learn More...A profession in perioperative and surgical nursing requires: an understanding of normal anatomy and physiology.keen assessment and monitoring skills.vast knowledge of invasive procedures.ongoing education related to the management of patients undergoing surgery.More perioperative and surgical nursing resourcesLearn More...Nursing Pocket Cards, including informed consentGuideline Summaries, including surgical site infection preventionBlog posts, with infographics, mnemonics, tips, and moreJournals Plastic Surgical NursingJournal of Pediatric Surgical NursingArticles and nursing continuing professional development (NCPD) activitiesHeadlines and news storiesSociety partners
Professional & Staff Development
Professional and staff development nurses strive to engage nurses in lifelong learning.What do professional and staff development nurses do?Learn More...Nurses in professional and staff development incorporate adult learning principles and instructional design standards into educational curriculum and assess performance outcomes. These nurses often participate in nursing research, share the results, and integrate new findings into clinical practice. They collaborate with multidisciplinary teams as well as administration to ensure high standards of quality patient care. Responsibilities of professional and staff development nurses include: overseeing staff education.supporting role transitions.providing training and resources for evidence-based nursing practice.mentoring new and veteran clinicians.developing orientation programs.coordinating ongoing competency plans.identifying educational priorities.encouraging quality improvement projects.More professional and staff development nursing resourcesLearn More...Nursing Pocket Cards, including quality improvement initiativesGuideline Summaries, including nursing delegationBlog posts, with infographics, mnemonics, tips, and moreJournals Journal for Nurses in Professional DevelopmentJournal of Nursing Care QualityNurse EducatorArticles and nursing continuing professional development (NCPD) activitiesHeadlines and news storiesSociety partners     ANPD Webinars  This series of recordings of live webinars were originally hosted by the Association for Nursing Professional Development (ANPD) and sponsored by Lippincott. 
Psychiatry-Mental Health Nursing
Psychiatry-mental health (PMH) nursing is a specialty focused on providing direct care to individuals, families, groups, and communities, assessing their mental health (American Psychiatric Nurses Association, 2018). What do psychiatric-mental health nurses do?Learn More...PMH nurses develop individualized plans for each patient, provide counseling, assist with activities of daily living and administer medications.Advanced practice PMH nurses assess, diagnose, and treat mental health problems by conducting psychotherapy sessions and prescribing psychiatric drugs.Where do psychiatric-mental health nurses work?Learn More...PMH nurses may work in a variety of settings including hospitals, psychiatric hospitals, home health agencies, correctional facilities, outpatient mental health organizations, and schools.What do psychiatric-mental health nurses need to know?Learn More...A profession in psychiatric/mental health nursing requires: an understanding of behavioral science and psychiatric disorders such as anxiety (panic attacks, phobias), mood disorders (depression, bipolar), substance abuse, and dementia.keen assessment and monitoring skills.vast knowledge of psychiatric medications and therapeutic techniques.experience in crisis intervention.More psychiatric-mental health nursing resourcesLearn More...Nursing Pocket Cards, including delirium, dementia, and depressionGuideline Summaries, including suicide risk assessmentBlog posts, with infographics, mnemonics, tips, and moreJournal Journal of Addictions NursingArticles and nursing continuing professional development (NCPD) activitiesHeadlines and news storiesSociety partners   Reference: American Psychiatric Nurses Association (2018). About APNA: Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurses. Retrieved from https://www.apna.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=3292#1
Women's Health
Women’s health nursing is a specialty focused on providing direct care to women throughout their lifespan.What do women's health nurses do?Learn More...Women's health nurses provide well-woman care, family planning services, pre-conception, prenatal and antepartum/postpartum care, treatment of acute and chronic illnesses, management of sexually transmitted diseases, mental health and eating disorders, and care during perimenopause and menopause.Advanced practice nurses in women’s health may also subspecialize in areas such as infertility, cardiovascular health, oncology, geriatrics, endocrinology, urogynecology, bone health, and high-risk pregnancy.Advanced practice nurses conduct history and physical exams; diagnose and administer treatments; prescribe medications; provide primary and specialty care; and play a vital role in patient education.Where do women's health nurses work?Learn More...Those who specialize in women’s health may work in a variety of settings, including hospitals, antepartum triage units, long-term care, primary care clinics/offices, community health centers, school and university clinics, health departments, and employee health settings.What do women's health nurses need to know?Learn More...A profession in women’s health not only requires an understanding of the female anatomy and physiology, but also a broad knowledge of gender-focused health assessment, education, and interventions.More women's health nursing resourcesLearn More...Nursing Pocket Cards, including sexually-transmitted infectionsGuideline Summaries, including ovarian cancerBlog posts, with infographics, mnemonics, tips, and moreJournal Journal of Women's Health Physical TherapyArticles and nursing continuing professional development (NCPD) activitiesHeadlines and news storiesSociety partners
Displaying results 25-34 (of 34)
 |<  <  1 - 2 - 3 >  >|