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Authors

  1. Noruzi, Zahra MSc
  2. Jayedi, Ahmad MSc
  3. Farazi, Mena MSc
  4. Moosavi, Hanieh MSc
  5. Janbozorgi, Nasim MSc
  6. Djafarian, Kurosh PhD
  7. Shab-Bidar, Sakineh PhD

Abstract

Objective: We aimed to assess the association of the Nordic-style diet score with general and abdominal obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in a population-based cross-sectional study of Iranian adults.

 

Methods: We recruited 843 participants with an age range of 18 to 65 years (mean [SD] age, 44.8 [10.7] years). Dietary intake was assessed by a 168-item semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. The Nordic-style diet score was calculated by using the median intake of 6 food groups including rye and whole grains, oatmeal, cabbage and vegetables, apples and pears, root vegetables, and fish. The odds ratio (OR) and 95% CI of obesity and MetS across tertiles of the Nordic diet score were calculated by logistic regression analysis with adjustment for age, sex, energy intake, physical activity, smoking status, education, and marital status.

 

Results: A higher score of adherence to the Nordic-style diet score was not associated with general and central adiposity and MetS. With regard to components of the MetS, those in the second tertile of the Nordic-style diet score were at a lower risk of increased serum cholesterol concentration (OR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.43-0.86; P = .006), and high systolic (OR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.42-1.00; P = .05) and diastolic (OR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.46-1.06; P = .09) blood pressure. There was no association between the Nordic-style diet score and other components of the MetS.

 

Conclusion: This study showed that there was no significant relationship between Nordic-style diet score and abdominal and general obesity and MetS. Adopting a Nordic-style diet may be associated with lower serum cholesterol concentration and blood pressure.