Conference Wrap-Up: LCNC & NMC

disney resort for nursing conference
How does a week in Disneyworld sound? Good, right? Add in two dynamic nursing conferences and you’ve got an amazing week! While it was busy, I’d like to share some highlights and encourage you to make attending a nursing conference a priority. There is nothing like being surrounded by nurses, hearing from nurses, and hanging out with nurses to renew your passion for nursing!

 


LCNC

lippincott clinical nursing conference swagLippincott Clinical Nursing Conference (LCNC) was up first. Geared to front-line nurses, this clinical-intensive included skill building sessions related to cardiac, pulmonary, and neurologic assessments. During the opening address, Christine Kessler, MN, CNS, ANP-BC, ADM, CDTC, FAANP gave attendees a choice in what they wanted to learn about – managing patients with diabetes or the impacts of shift work. I don’t know many speakers who can poll the audience and then present based on those results! If you’re wondering, attendees opted to hear about shift work and the session was informative and thought-provoking. While some might think that night shift is the most opportune time for nurses to take care of certain tasks (think baths and other personal care), it’s not always what’s best for patients. 

Another opportunity that presented itself to me at LCNC was the chance to speak myself. It’s been a while since I presented to a large group and it felt good to connect with attendees during the session on adverse drug reactions. I quickly got through my nerves and I think that we all learned some things!  

Nursing Management Congress

carolyn jones and lisa bonsall at nursing conferenceNursing Management Congress (NMC) followed and did not disappoint. Never have I attended a conference session where the opening session ended in a standing ovation followed by silence. I’ve been a fan of Carolyn Jones’ work on The American Nurse Project for several years. I am not kidding that I was somewhat starstruck sitting there in the front row while she presented and then again later when I met her in the exhibit hall. I’m also really looking forward to her new project, Dying in America. I’ve mentioned before about my interested in end-of-life care and after watching the trailer for this new film, I know I won’t be disappointed. 

I also spent time helping out with the New Manager Intensive preconference workshops. Day one focused on finance and day two focused on leadership. Wow! I knew nurse managers have a lot to juggle, but these two days really opened my eyes to the amount of calculations, hiring and firing issues, workplace conflict situations, and so much more that’s involved in their work each day. I’ll be sharing some more from this conference in the next few days, so stay tuned…

Don’t forget to visit Lippincott’s eConference Center to complete your session evaluations and obtain your CE certificates. You can see more photos from these conferences on NursingCenter’s Facebook page

 
Posted: 10/20/2015 9:21:45 PM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 0 comments

Categories: Continuing EducationLeadership Education & Career


Nurse On the Move: Lauren Everingham

 
IMG_1484.JPGLauren Everingham RN works on the Pediatric Medicine and Pediatric Short Stay units of All Children’s Hospital Johns Hopkins Medicine in St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Everingham is a second-career nurse. She originally studied writing at Muhlenberg College and worked as an editor for a healthcare magazine. Feeling drawn to a more service-oriented job, she earned her master’s degree in teaching English literature from Western Carolina University and briefly taught English in a North Carolina high school. Everingham quickly realized that she would prefer to serve children and families in a different capacity and went on to earn her BSN from the university’s nursing program. She finally found her home as a pediatric nurse.

Now, equipped with her nursing expertise, Everingham just came back from a week-long medical mission to the Dominican Republic with Team Tampa Bay. There, she used her nursing knowledge to help set up medical clinics and provide care to the people who reside in the bateys, which are small villages in the sugar cane fields of La Romana

Through our email interview, we discussed why Everingham decided to pursue nursing, how it has changed her life, and what her medical mission taught her. 

*After our interview, Hurricane Erika resulted in unforeseen tragedy and disaster in the Dominican Republic. To make a donation, please visit the Caribbean Red Cross

Q: After earning an advanced degree in teaching, what made you decide to switch careers to nursing?
A: I quickly became disenfranchised by the state of education in North Carolina—its teachers are some of the lowest paid in the United States, the state government has eliminated the master’s degree supplement, and when I graduated in mid-2010, teaching positions were being cut left and right due to our struggling economy. For me, the best part about teaching was the kids, so I sought out a career that would allow me to help children while also securing my own future. Turns out, the third career’s the charm! Plus, I use my teaching skills every single day as a nurse.

Q: How has becoming a nurse impacted your life? 
A: Being a nurse in a children’s hospital means I am daily reminded to count my blessings. I am sure all nurses feel this way. It is so easy to take your own health and well-being for granted. My job puts me face to face with children and families coping with heartbreaking traumas, difficult chronic illnesses, terminal disease, abuse and neglect. I am more aware of how fortunate I have been, and I am honored to be able to help these families through a difficult time in their lives.

IMG_1359.JPGQ: What made you choose pediatrics as your specialty? 
A: Above, I mentioned some of the dark things I witness as a pediatric nurse. But, I also experience joy at work every day: seeing mermaids roll down the hallway in wheelchairs to visit patients, watching a child hug his new foster parent for the first time, and helping new parents pose for a picture with their tiny baby who they finally get to bring home after three months in the NICU. Every time I walk into the hospital, through the brightly colored hallways, past the pirate ship playground, and into the elevator where a child’s voice announces, “Going up!,” I think how lucky I am to work in pediatrics. I wish adult hospitals were more like children’s hospitals; I think people would heal faster.


Q: Can you describe why your medical mission to the Dominican Republic was important to you? 
A: I have always wanted to participate in a project like this. My life has been full of opportunity and I’ve been fortunate to have access to education and training. The least I can do is use my skills and education to help people who don’t even have access to basic medical care. Plus, I knew it would be a life-changing experience. It’s one thing to be educated about the struggles of people living in poverty around the world; it’s another thing to see it firsthand. I know I gained more from the people in the bateys of La Romana than I could ever offer to them.

FullSizeRender-(5).jpgQ: What was it like working in nursing outside of the U.S.? 
A: We worked with Dominican physicians and we had very limited resources, so needless to say it was a lot different than nursing here. We navigated language barriers and encountered different practices in dosing medications. It was also eye opening. One of the older patients we saw had a blood pressure of 210/110. Here in the states, we would have done a comprehensive workup for this patient. There, we had to give the gentleman some blood pressure medication and briefly educate him, and that was it. Hopefully there will be some follow up with those types of patients, but we will not be there to see that, so it was pretty unsettling.
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Q: What was your favorite part of your trip? 
A: The kids. They were full of joy and so proud of what little they had. At the first batey we visited, child after child took our hands and led us around to show us their fruit trees. Another day, a group of about 15 kids walked us out into the sugar cane fields, cut down some sugar cane, and showed us how to taste it. The sense of community among the batey children was so beautiful to watch. An older child would give a small child medicine or carry him down a hill when the younger child was afraid. They played in large groups of widely varying ages. They walked around the village holding hands. It was inspiring, and I hope to provide my future children with that sense of community. 
 
Q: You worked with other medical and non-medical volunteers. How did your skills as a nurse fit in interprofessionally on your mission? 
A: The team was made up of 10 American nurses and several Dominican doctors and translators. In previous years, non-medical volunteers (often teenagers) have also accompanied Team Tampa Bay and helped hand out supplies and play with the children. As nurses, our role was to take blood pressures and measure blood sugars, fill prescriptions, administer medications, and hand out supplies. We were able to ensure correct dosing of medications and appropriate antibiotic prescriptions, as well as screen patients for potential surgical needs or other in-depth follow up care. We also helped the translators to educate patients about how to take their medications properly.
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Q: What is the biggest issue that you encountered with healthcare in La Romana? 
A: Access to care. The bateys are often in very remote areas, requiring us to ride 30 to 45 minutes or longer on our school bus from the city. The folks living out there do not have cars, and there is no public transportation. So most of the time, there is no way to get to a doctor’s office or a hospital. This is frequently a problem for women in labor—they often give birth in the batey without any midwife, nurse or medical assistance because they simply cannot get to a hospital. It can be a life-threatening situation for both mom and baby.

Q: What will happen to the medical clinics your team set up now that you left the country? 
A: The medical clinics that we set up are temporary—we set them up and take them down all in one day. However, the Good Samaritan Mission is a large organization that is in place year round and hosts more than 60 mission teams throughout the year. Each team visits several bateys and in total the mission reaches approximately 3,000 people in more than 100 bateys each year. Unfortunately, there aren’t enough teams and supplies to reach every batey each month, so many of the people we saw were provided with a 30-day supply of medication but will not have the opportunity to visit another clinic for months. When it comes to cardiac and diabetic medications, for example, it is a really big problem.
 
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Q: Would you recommend other nurses sign up for a medical mission with Team Tampa Bay, and what are some of the other projects they could get involved in? 
A: I would definitely recommend joining Team Tampa Bay on a medical mission to La Romana. It was an incredible experience. The leaders of our team work hard to organize these trips every year and they are always in need of more volunteers, supplies, and donations. Nurses can also organize their own mission team through Good Samaritan or get involved with some of their other projects, including the clean water, construction, and Sugar Cane Kids programs.


Q: Finally, what do you see for the future of nursing? 
A: As I mentioned above, nurses are uniquely poised to provide solutions for many of the problems we face in our health care system today. Forward-thinking and innovative nurses, whether in bedside care, outpatient, management, or advanced practice, will seize opportunities to lead us toward a more preventative, holistic approach to healthcare.

*Disclaimer: The author of this blog has a personal relationship with the interviewed party. 

Do you know an inspiring nurse to be featured for the next Nurse On the Move? Email your submissions to ClinicalEditor@NursingCenter.com.

 
Posted: 9/3/2015 9:10:54 AM by Cara Deming | with 1 comments

Categories: Leadership


Nurse On the Move: Lisa Gorski


ALisa-Gorski.jpgfter a short hiatus, Nurses On the Move is back and better than ever! I am excited to bring you our next nurse
leader, Lisa A. Gorski MS, RN, HHCNS-BC, CRNI, FAAN. With more than 30 years in the field, Gorski is an expert in both home healthcare and infusion nursing. As a clinical nurse specialist at Wheaton Franciscan Home Health & Hospice in Wisconsin, an editorial board member of Home Healthcare Now, an associate consultant for OASIS ANSWERS, Inc., and a published author, her knowledge of the nursing profession is truly impressive.

Through our phone interview, I spoke with Gorski about why she decided to enter into home healthcare, her time as president of the Infusion Nurses Society, and what advice she has for a nurse starting their career.

BONUS: The current issue of Home Healthcare Now is FREE until August 15th on NursingCenter.

Q:  Why did you choose nursing as a profession?
A:
I wanted to be a nurse since I was a young child. When I was 5 or 6 years old, I drew a picture and wrote a story about how I wanted to be a nurse and help people! That desire never waned. In high school, my intense interest in the sciences and a summer of volunteer work in a hospital as a ”candy striper” reinforced my goal to become a nurse. 

Q:  What attracted you to home healthcare?
A:
I knew that I wanted to work with patients on a longer term basis. I had several graduate school colleagues who worked in home healthcare, and at the time, changes in reimbursement led to shorter hospital length of stay and more transitioning to home care. I saw a potential future in home healthcare.  

The challenges and opportunities in this specialty were apparent to me, including working with families, as well as patients, and working with them over longer periods of time to keep them functioning well in their home.  There is a great need for employing effective patient education to help patients manage their own care. While the assessment and intervention skills that I gained in my acute care experience served me, I needed to develop a new body of knowledge. While I could manage blood sugar levels in a critically ill patient, working with home care patients to manage their diabetes was a different challenge that required not only the clinical focus on diabetes, but also a focus on living with a chronic illness. In graduate school, I studied the issues related to living with chronic illnesses. One of the books I read during graduate school still sits on my bookshelf and still provides me with perspective – Chronic Illness and the Quality of Life by Strauss and Glaser (1975).  

Q:  What’s the biggest challenge related to home healthcare and how do you combat it?
A:
One challenge is time management. Home care nurses travel and generally see five to six patients on the same day. Depending on the needs of the patients, there is also a considerable amount of time coordinating care and communicating with other involved healthcare professionals. As any home care nurse will tell you, there is a considerable burden of documentation. And you must be accountable to that patient and family. When you leave the home, you have to think about what happens or could happen when you leave – have you addressed critical issues to ensure that your patient will be safe when you are gone, as there is no one else there until you get back. Think about the patient with a running infusion of a chemotherapy drug. Does the patient understand what to do and who to call if an alarm occurs or if there is an adverse reaction; is the phone number to call for problems readily available?

On the bigger picture side, the pressures of ensuring positive patient outcomes with reimbursement restraints are challenging. An overarching goal of home care is to keep patients safe in their homes. The hospitalization rate for home health is a publically reported outcome, and hospitals are penalized when patients return back to the hospital within 30 days. As a nurse who has worked in home care for 30 years, the level of patient acuity has certainly increased. I believe the challenge for home care nurses is to become less focused on the tasks to be done, such as wound care or other treatments, and more focused on identifying the nursing diagnoses and managing the outcomes. Keeping patients at home requires that the nurse possess exceptional assessment skills, that risk factors for re-hospitalization are identified and mitigated, that ongoing monitoring identifies and reports  early/subtle changes in condition to allow early intervention, and that there is significant attention paid to medication management.

Q:  Why are you passionate about infusion nursing?
A:
I became a home care nurse during the mid-1980s during that period of great growth in the home care industry. Transitioning patients who required infusion therapy from the hospital to home was a growing trend.  

At that time, I managed many patients who required home infusion therapy from simple IV antibiotics to complex parenteral nutrition. My critical care skills combined with my growing experience in home care issues served me well in that area of practice. However, one of the issues that I identified was that exceptional IV therapy skills are not enough in home care. Because patients and families are involved in various aspects of self-care related to the IV infusion, the home care nurse’s skills in patient education are equally important. Patients are often anxious or may have functional limitations that impact the ability to learn and manage, and these must be addressed. My first published article  in Home Healthcare Nurse in 1987 addressed the patient education issue. I later wrote three books on the topic of home infusion therapy and am in the process of writing another.  

Q:  You served as the president of the Infusion Nurses Society (INS) from 2007 to 2008. How did that role impact your profession in nursing?
A:
After being involved in the INS for many years in a variety of local chapter and national positions, it was an honor to serve as president for that year. Subsequently, I continued to serve INS as the chairperson for the 2011 Infusion Nursing Standards of Practice and am currently serving again in that role for the standards that will be published in 2016. There is a rapidly growing research base for infusion therapy by investigators across the world. Working with my amazing infusion therapy colleagues to search and review the literature and to develop evidence-based recommendations and educate the infusion community has contributed to improved patient outcomes and reduction of preventable complications. My INS involvement has led to so many opportunities. I have had the pleasure of doing many presentations across the country and some international presentations. I regularly talk to or have email discussions with nurses, pharmacists, and physicians regarding infusion related issues and practices. I recently had the opportunity to present in Santiago, Chile and Buenos Aires, Argentina and will be doing presentations in China later this summer. Clearly, nurses not only in the U.S., but across the globe, are striving to provide the best practices for their patients. 
 
Q:  The nursing journal, Home Healthcare Now, was previously titled Home Healthcare Nurse. Why did this publication change its name?
A: Home healthcare nurses have always worked collaboratively with other disciplines, including physical, occupational, and speech therapists, social workers, and pharmacists to name a few. The collaborative relationship has always been strong in homecare – this was evident to me from the minute I became a home care nurse. The focus is on interprofessional care, and I think the new title reflects that. 





Q:  For a nurse starting out, what would be your number one piece of advice?
A:
Nurses today have so many opportunities in many different settings. When you leave a position, you want to feel as if you’ve mastered it. Really learn your first job and develop your skills, especially in working with other healthcare providers. Identify where your strengths lie and use them to determine where you want to go. Also, get involved in nursing organizations relevant to your practice. I am also a member of the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists and the American Nurses Association, which have provided me with more information and knowledge and more contact with colleagues who share similar interests and challenges. I recently attended the International Home Care Nurses Organization (IHCNO) where I was inspired by reports of research and home care practices in several countries. Involvement in practice beyond our daily organizational work keeps us fresh and motivated!

Q:  Finally, what do you envision for the future of nursing?
A:
It is really bright! There are so many opportunities for nurses in a variety of settings whether clinical or non-clinical. Nurses are shaping healthcare policy and are increasingly involved in politics. Our critical thinking, expertise, and leadership make an incredible impact in patient care. We are healthcare leaders. 

*Do you know an inspiring nurse to be featured for the next Nurse On the Move? Email your submissions to
ClinicalEditor@NursingCenter.com.

 
Posted: 8/4/2015 8:10:59 AM by Cara Deming | with 1 comments

Categories: Leadership


Nurse On the Move: Scott DeBoer

“Nursing has been a blessing to me and my family that has allowed me to travel the globe and care for the sickest of the sick across the lifespan.” Scott DeBoer RN, MSN, CPEN, CEN, CCRN, CFRN is a nurse leader with more than 20 years of experience. Currently, he serves as a flight nurse for the University of Chicago Hospitals. He is also a founder of Peds-R-Us Medical Education, a seminar company interested in enhancing the care of children. 

DeBoer wrote the Certified Pediatric Emergency Nurse Review book, which is now in its third edition, as well a body piercing removal handbook, and a book on emergency care for newborns. He earned his master's degree in critical care nursing from Purdue University in 1996 and spent time there as a clinical nursing instructor. 

As our next Nurse On the Move, DeBoer is eager to promote the nursing profession and offer his views on nursing education, pediatric care, and the future of nursing. 

Q: Why did you choose nursing as a profession?
A: I grew up thinking I was going to be a pediatrician, however, after several orthopedic injuries in high school and way too much time spent in the ER, I learned to love the nurses and not be so enthralled with the physicians. Nursing has been an absolutely amazing career.

Q: What attracted you to the career of a flight nurse?
A: Very early in my career, the flight team picked up a 3-month old child in status epilepticus from our ER. I was freaking out to say the least, as I’d never given Valium to anyone that small in my life. The flight crew was nothing short of amazing; I knew from that point on that flight/transport nursing was what I wanted to do as a career.

Q: How important is it for nurses to continue their education?
A: I would say education is crucial, especially for nurses just entering the profession. A bachelor's degree is essential. I work with many incredibly skilled paramedics who obtained their associate's degree in nursing from local community colleges, however, they can't get nursing jobs as many hospitals won't even interview without a bachelor's degree.

Q: Why is pediatric emergency care important to you?
A: Simply, I don't really like taking care of big people. If have a choice, I prefer taking care of sick kids – kids are amazing. They tend to get really sick, really fast, which of course can be scary, but, when they get better, they get better really fast as well. They haven't had years of bad habits (Burger King, beer, etc.) to result in their illness or injuries. They're good kids who’ve bad things happen to them. I just try to help them (and their families) get better.

Q: For a nurse starting out, what would be your number one piece of advice? 
A: Beyond getting your bachelor's, it's not being afraid to ask questions of experienced nurses on the unit. The idea that there is no stupid question, especially when it applies to patient care, is really true. What you learned in school is a very, very small part of what you learn on the job from everyone from housekeeping and unit secretaries (they are truly invaluable) to the chief of surgery. Everyone has something they are an expert at and most times are willing (and happy) to teach, if asked by those honestly desiring to learn.

Q: What do you see as a major obstacle/problem in the current nursing environment? 
A: The electronic medical record epidemic – they aren’t going anywhere. I know this and have resigned myself to this fact, however, I truly miss the ability to sit on the patient's bed, look them in the eye, and get a quick history. In many facilities, I have to look at a computer screen bolted to the wall while trying to talk to the patient or their family in another part of the room. This is not ideal – the focus needs to be on the patient and their family, not on clicking computer keys. 

Q: What do you envision for the future of nursing?
A: I envision an ongoing advancement in the roles of advanced practice nurses, especially with continued financial considerations and changes in healthcare reimbursement. On the transport medicine side, more patients will be transported by ambulance versus helicopters, and emergency departments will continue to see more patients, as access to primary care practitioners remains an issue. 

*Do you know an inspiring nurse to be featured for the next Nurse On the Move? Email your submissions to ClinicalEditor@NursingCenter.com.

Posted: 2/25/2015 2:08:39 PM by Cara Deming | with 1 comments

Categories: Leadership


Nurse On the Move: Jeff Doucette

“The number one thing that a nurse can do is guard their integrity as if it is their most prized possession.” Jeff Doucette DNP, RN, FACHE, CENP, understands just how small the nursing community is. Regardless of where a nurse works, their actions and choices will follow them, he explains. 

With a career like his, he should know. Doucette is currently the vice president of patient care services and chief nursing officer at Bon Secours Mary Immaculate Hospital in Newport News, Va. He is an executive nurse fellow with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, as well as adjunct faculty in the DNP program at Old Dominion University. He is also the chairperson for Nursing Management Congress2015 and on the editorial advisory board for the Nursing Management journal. 

This month, I had the opportunity to speak with Doucette, our next Nurse On the Move, and learn why integrity is a nurse’s most valuable asset. We also discussed why Lean management can improve healthcare, what Nursing Management Congress has planned this year, and what he sees for the future of nursing. 

Listen for the whole interview...

*Do you know a great candidate to be featured for Nurses On the Move? We want to know about the nurses who are advancing the profession and inspiring others to do the same. We will feature a new nurse every month. Email your submissions to ClinicalEditor@NursingCenter.com.

 

 

Posted: 1/29/2015 7:20:50 PM by Cara Deming | with 2 comments

Categories: Leadership


Nurse On the Move: JoAnne Phillips

“Nursing is the toughest job you will ever love.” JoAnne Phillips MSN, RN, CCRN, CCNS, CPPS, recognizes that hard work can produce gratifying results. As a manager of quality and patient safety at Penn Home Care & Hospice Services, a clinical informatics professional development specialist at the University of Pennsylvania Health System, and a doctoral student working towards her DNP at Vanderbilt University, Phillips doesn’t take her role as a nurse lightly. She is constantly looking to improve the quality of life of those around her, which is why she is our next Nurse On the Move

Phillips preiously served as a clinical nurse specialist in the transition, surgical critical care, and patient safety departments of the University of Pennsylvania. She earned her master’s degree in science in critical care nursing from Widener University, and prior to that, she served as a clinical instructor and staff nurse at Hahnemann University Hospital. 

Through our interview, I learned why Phillips chose to go back to school, as well as why she sees nursing as the best job to make a difference in a person’s life. 

Q: What made you choose nursing as a career?
A: When I was hospitalized as a child, I watched what the nurses were doing and I thought that is what I wanted to do. When I was older, I worked as a volunteer in the neonatal intensive care nursery. Then I knew that was what I wanted to do. I can’t exactly say it was a calling, but pretty close. 

Q: What is your favorite aspect of being a critical care nurse?
A: I had the opportunity to work at the Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore, where I truly learned the impactful role that a primary nurse could play in the patient’s outcome.  Patients could be incredibly sick, and I knew that the best medical care partnered with the best nursing care could lead to the best patient outcomes. As a lifelong learner, I thrived on the constant opportunity to learn more in critical care. 

Q: You specialize in patient safety. What is the biggest concern you have regarding the well-being of patients and how are you combatting it?
A: I don’t think patient safety is one issue, but a virtual kaleidoscope of issues. We need to better understand how systems work together and the role human factors (how we interact with processes and technology). Since humans will always be part of the equation, we need to know that there will be mistakes. Our role as safety leaders is to make it less likely that humans will make a mistake. Something I tell my colleagues, “If we make it easy for people to do the right thing, they will do the right thing.  If we make it too complex, they will do workarounds.” That is often where we see negative outcomes. 

Q: In your role as a clinical informatics educator, why do you feel informatics is important to nursing?
A: I would encourage nurses to work toward letting the computer work for you, instead of you working for the computer. We hear from staff that documenting in the computer is too hard. My response is that we have not designed the system correctly. One of the staff told me it takes eight clicks to chart a dirty diaper – a great example that we have made it too hard. Bottom line is [computers] are here to stay; [they are] an unbelievable resource of information.  Once we have better interoperability (computer systems talking to each other), it will be awesome. 

Q: You are working towards earning your DNP. What made you decide to go back to school?
A: The more I learn about patient safety, the more I realize to work toward a solution, I needed to understand even more about systems. My DNP program is focused on health systems management, and I believe it will position me to take a leadership role in patient safety, to mentor and develop many others to understand how we can create a safe environment for our staff and patients. 

Q: What is the most vital thing a nurse can do to improve their career?
A: To be a nurse today, I think you need to be a lifelong learner. Not just in an academic setting, but through ongoing personal and professional development. There are endless opportunities for nurses to learn and develop – conferences, memberships in professional organizations, online learning.  If finances are a struggle, many of these opportunities are free.   

Q: What do you see for the future of nursing?  
A: Nurses are the solution to the future of healthcare. We spend 75% of our healthcare dollars on chronic care. There is no one better positioned to manage patients with chronic, complex medical issues than a nurse. We need to create an environment that will draw and keep the best people in nursing. What better job is there than to know that you made a difference in someone’s life? Even if that difference is helping them to a peaceful death. As many have said before, nursing is the toughest job you will ever love. 

Do you work with a nurse that inspires you? Nominate them to be our next Nurse On the Move by emailing submissions to ClinicalEd

Posted: 11/4/2014 7:43:41 PM by Cara Deming | with 2 comments

Categories: Leadership


Nurses On the Move: Paula Roe

As fall gets underway and nurses head back to school, it’s important to look at how academic and professional education can shape a nurse in different ways.

September’s Nurse On the Move,Paula Roe BSN, MBA/HCM, FACHE, has a unique experience with nursing. She currently serves Simpler Consulting as a senior advisor - where she helps clients achieve sustainable breakthrough improvements in care quality, productivity, and cost reduction by applying process improvement techniques to daily operations – and operational excellence practice leader, responsible for Simpler’s internal process improvement.

She previously spent six years as the vice president of operations for St. Elizabeth Healthcare, a regional hospital system located in northern Kentucky. Before that, Roe spent 13 years with the Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing American, where she learned the tools of the Lean management trade.Roe’s experiences have shaped her perspective as a nurse and operations leader. Through our interview, I discovered how these different settings impacted her thoughts on nursing and patient care. 

Q: Why did you choose to receive your BSN and start your nursing career?
A: A career in nursing was not my original plan. When I enrolled at Ohio State University, I was on course for a degree in engineering. By my sophomore year…I was forced to take the pre-medical school-level anatomy class to fulfill an undergraduate requirement. As soon as the class was underway, I knew I was hooked. I soon met with my advisor and found that nursing was the best match for me.

Q: You went on to manage a CTU/SICU department of a hospital. How did this shape your decision to earn your MBA in health care management?
A: Early in my nursing career, I was involved in staff nurse counsel and had the opportunity to present to hospital administration on a regular basis. I really enjoyed this interaction and pursued hospital administration as department manager of the CTU/SICU. When I went to work for Toyota as a safety, health and environmental administrator, I never lost that dream of working in healthcare administration. Lucky for me, Toyota offered MBA programs on campus, and I was able to earn my master’s degree specifically for healthcare management. 

Q: Please describe what Lean management means to you and why you believe it’s an important tool for nurses to use?
A: Lean is all about delivering value to the customer. From a nursing perspective, the customer is the patient and the patient’s family. When you think about nursing and the tenants of Lean – striving for zero defects, the relentless pursuit of value, and the delivery of service in the least wasteful way – the two are necessarily harmonious…The delivery of care is spending time with the patient and delivering care value. We need to relentlessly pursue the elimination of wasteful steps, challenging our day-to-day activities to spend more time with patients and deliver the best care in the least wasteful way. 

Q: In your role at Toyota, how did Lean management practices and role process improvement techniques shape your perspective as a nurse and operations leader?
A: When you start a career with Toyota, you start a lifelong journey of hands-on learning. The training advances as you practice and apply these Lean skills. Lean is also a team-based model; it allows teams to bring their ideas and thoughts together so the whole group is focused on what matters most. But with Lean, the team makes decisions together on execution and output as well. And action is immediate, meaning you are able to achieve breakthrough results within a very short time. I very quickly saw how Lean’s team-based approach could be applied to the nursing world.

Q: How do you define a nurse leader?
A: I came across not long ago a quote from renowned leadership expert Dr. Stephen Covey: “Leaders do what’s right and managers do the right thing.” To me, a nursing leader is one who does what’s right for his or her staff, the patient, the organization, and the population served.. 

Q: What do you see for the future of nursing?
A: I believe that nursing will continue to be developed from within the profession and innovative ways to deliver care and patient treatment models will emerge. But, nurses will have to also look outside of nursing for solution approaches. I foresee Lean and other management techniques more widely accessed. I believe the pace of change in the industry is going to require new and breakthrough ways of looking at things, and traditional improvement approaches are going to be challenged. As Einstein said, “Insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.” In nursing, we’ll need to think outside of the traditional nursing box to eliminate waste and to ultimately spend more by the patient bedside.

Do you know a great candidate to be featured for Nurses On the Move? We want to know about the nurses who are advancing the profession and inspiring others to do the same. We will feature a new nurse every month. Email your submissions to ClinicalEditor@NursingCenter.com.

Posted: 9/19/2014 8:10:47 PM by Cara Deming | with 0 comments

Categories: Leadership


Nurses On the Move: Lorry Schoenly

Nurses work in all types of environments. Whether it is an ER, university, military, consulting firm, or even a prison, the role of the nurse goes far beyond the typical hospital setting.

July’s Nurse On the Move, Lorry Schoenly PhD, RN, CCHP-RN, is a correctional healthcare risk consultant for jail and prison clients. She also currently serves as part of the faculty at the Chamberlain College of Nursing and writes a monthly column on correctional healthcare issues, along with podcasts.

Schoenly previously served as the director of education of the National Association of Orthopaedic Nurses and assistant vice president of Rancocas Hospital, among other titles. She started her career as a staff nurse. She received her bachelor’s of nursing from Excelsior College and earned both her master’s in burns, emergency, and trauma, and doctorate in nursing from Widener University.

Through our interview, I learned why Schoenly went into correctional nursing and what daily reminder she has for nurses.

Q: Why did you decide to become a nurse?
A:  I never imagined being a nurse while growing up. I come from a family of educators. While in critical care after the difficult delivery of our son, I looked around at the nurses scurrying about and thought, "These folks are doing meaningful work.” I was hooked.

Q: You started as a staff nurse and remained in that role for a little over three years. What motivated you to continue your education and become a staff instructor and, eventually, a director of education?
A:  I guess I have always been an educator at heart. As a staff nurse…I was like a sponge soaking up information from any inservice or continuing education course I could find. I was thrilled to apply and be accepted [to a staff development position]…where I was able to continue in patient care, while managing the orientation of new staff and creating inservices for new treatment and equipment. For me, it was an ideal combination.

Q: As a nurse educator, what advice do you have to inspire others to further their education?
A:  You can almost never go wrong with education. One of the joys of nursing is the wide array of opportunities. If you are unhappy in your current position, research other options and determine what is needed for an entry-level position. Enjoy the journey and seek to apply everything you learn in the classroom into your current work experiences.

Q: How did you become interested in correctional nursing?
A:  Like many in our specialty, I am an accidental correctional nurse. I don't know anyone who announced as a child that they wanted to be a jail nurse when they grew up. In fact, it had never occurred to me that nurses worked in jails and prisons until I answered an advertisement for a nurse educator position in the NJ prison system. However, once I saw the great need for nursing care and nursing caring behind bars, I saw an opportunity to bring my skills and abilities to bear both locally and nationally. Correctional nurses care for a vulnerable, marginalized, and very needy patient population. And, it takes grit and determination to work in that environment day after day. I see firsthand the struggles correctional nurses have in the low resourced and ethically challenging criminal justice system. I do what I can to support their efforts.

Q: As a correctional healthcare consultant, what is your biggest challenge related to patient care?
A: The greatest challenge I face when helping improve patient care is organizational culture. Pervasive attitudes among team members are hard to eradicate. We want quick fixes, whether it be losing weight, getting dinner on the table, or improving a relationship. It is the same in healthcare. Leaders want to write a policy, inservice staff, and then move on to the next thing on the list. It doesn't work like that in organizations, even though we wish it would!

Q: If you could give nurses a daily reminder, what would it be?
A: The encouragement I use at the end of each of my Correctional Nursing Today podcasts is to "Make today count for good.”  As nurses, we always have an opportunity to make a difference in someone's life, and I try to remind myself of that regularly. A quotation on the whiteboard of my office that encourages me is from Goethe, "Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Willing is not enough; we must do,” As an educator, I try to continually encourage others to apply what they are learning, otherwise it is for naught.

Q: What do you see for the future of nursing?
A:  The future of nursing is bright as we move forward. There are many opportunities for nurses to make a difference, no matter the position or location. Correctional nursing, in particular, is advancing as a specialty, and I am delighted to be a part of it!

Posted: 7/31/2014 8:39:12 PM by Cara Deming | with 0 comments

Categories: Leadership


Nurses On the Move: Helene Bowen-Brady

As summer heats up, so do the incredible nurses who focus on the hottest professional topics.

This month’s
Nurse On the Move is Helene Bowen-Brady, M.Ed, BSN, RN-BC, the program manager for professional development at Brigham and Women's Faulkner Hospital. Not only does she focus on guiding the Department of Nursing on a Magnet Journey, but she also sits on the Steering Committee for the CLCDN (Clinical Leadership Collaborative for Diversity in Nursing), and recently served as the site coordinator for an international nursing research project.

Bowen-Brady previously served as a nurse educator, lactation consultant, and school nurse, all while raising her four children. She received her BSN from Boston College. She also earned a master’s degree and is currently exploring doctoral programs.

I interviewed Bowen-Brady to discover what drew her to such different roles in nursing and what she sees for the profession in the future.

Q: Why did you choose nursing as a profession?

A: Honestly, I wasn’t sure when I was 16 what I wanted to do. In the early 70’s, the career advice I received was to become either a teacher or a nurse. In the end, the motivation was simply that nurses who went to diploma schools got to live away at school, and if I became a teacher, I would have to commute to college. At 16, it was a very easy decision – I wanted to live away.  In retrospect, it was the best decision for me. As a nurse, I have had an incredible career.

Q: You worked with Canton public schools as a school nurse. How was that working environment and why did you choose to pursue a different venue for nursing?

A: I started working as a substitute nurse because the hours worked for my family. Little did I know what a great career move that would turn out to be and what wonderful clinical and leadership experiences school nursing would provide. In all of the nursing roles that I have had, I think that school nursing was probably the most challenging. School nurses work independently in most settings to manage a variety of complex acute and chronic healthcare needs for students of all ages.

Q: You were previously a lactation consultant. What drew you to that role?

A: Personal need – when my first son was born there was limited, if any, support for breastfeeding mothers in my community. When I worked as a VNA nurse, I was fortunate to work with an innovative nurse director who supported me to expand the services we provided for families with newborns.

Q: What encouraged you to continue your education as a nurse?

A: I believe that lifelong learning is essential for every nurse. The knowledge I gain from reading journal articles, attending classes, listening to webinars, or taking an online class absolutely helps me to be a better practitioner.

Q: You’ve spent a good amount of your career working in staff development and education. How has professional development changed over the years, if at all?

A: The biggest change is the technology. When I first became an educator in 1980, I had to handwrite every lecture, which was then typed by the department secretary since she was the only person with a typewriter. Finding relevant journal articles meant a trip to a hospital library or a local college. Today, I have countless electronic folders stored on my computer. Search engines make it easy to find reliable and current information about any topic. There are so many new and innovative technological strategies and tools that educators can use to engage adult learners in order to positively enhance learning activities to make them more meaningful for staff.

Q: What do you envision for the future of nursing?

A: When I entered nursing school in the early 70’s, healthcare was primarily provided in the acute care hospital. Over the past 40 years, healthcare has changed dramatically. Nurses have an opportunity to play key roles in the future of healthcare and most of these expanded roles will be outside of the inpatient setting. I truly believe that the changes ahead will prove to be in the best interest of our patients and families.

Q: For a nurse starting out, what would be your number one piece of advice?

A: It would be to encourage nurses to get involved. Step outside the comfort zone of the unit or area you work in – join a committee at work or the professional organization that represents your practice area’s local chapter. There are so many incredibly talented and innovative nurses within the profession that each one of us can learn from. 

Posted: 6/24/2014 9:07:03 PM by Cara Deming | with 0 comments

Categories: Leadership


Technology and Global Health: A Nurse Presents For the U.N.

On May 16th, Dr. Anne Dabrow Woods, Chief Nurse of Wolters Kluwer Medical Research and the publisher of American Journal of Nursing and Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) at Wolters Kluwer, was a special guest speaker for the United Nations and the World Health Organization on “E-health: Using Technology to Improve Global Public Health” during the Global Classrooms® International Model United Nations 2014. In attendance at the three-day conference were 2,300 students from more than 20 nations. The event was held at United Nations Headquarters and the Grand Hyatt Hotel in New York City.

During her presentation, Anne discussed the importance of access to evidence-based practice resources from global collaborations such as JBI and exposed future policymakers to the principles of evidence-based practice. Anne fielded over 20 delegate questions, including the impact of "Big Pharma"  policies on global health, ensuring clean water, food and sanitation as foundations for health in developing nations, and how new technologies, such as apps and robots, are changing healthcare practice today. 

Submitted by:
Janet Feeney
Senior Marketing Manager
Medical Research
Wolters Kluwer

Posted: 6/19/2014 4:55:57 PM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 0 comments

Categories: Leadership


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